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doing a garage remodel and wondering how best to keep the garage door on facade and still be able to have A/C in the garage? I live in hot and humid south Texas. Is this a ridiculous solution to cutting cost of new brick facade. Are there any foreseen code issues or issues in general?

  • Depending on the use of the room, there could be issues of sufficient exits if the garage door is inoperable. – manassehkatz Sep 4 '18 at 2:05
  • @manassehkatz- Thanks, yeah I was actually wanting to add a door to the side of garage. That will bring it to code as I would need two exits. A window would work but would rather have door. The space will be used as a home school area, and play area for kids mostly. And possibly later an extra sleepover area. – Caleb Ayres Sep 4 '18 at 3:21
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There are kits you can buy to stuff into most traditional garage doors and get a decent amount of R value into the door (not as much as a wall, but not 0).

If you're wanting to block the door and insulate, you might just be able to rig up some 2x4 framing within the doorway, insulate and do something simple like concrete board outside (I'm not sure if there's any code that would prevent this, so check local codes before doing it). Done with screws, it could be dismantled if you change your mind.

I wouldn't brick the door off since removing the garage door in a permanent way like that might impact the resale value later on.

  • Oh cool I may look into the kits for insulating garage doors. I like both of your suggestions. I may have to run by wife on the framing in the doorway as I m not sure she would go for the look of it on the outside if it didn’t match the brick facade. I also like it because removing the door tracks on ceiling will allow me to build the kids play lofts where I wanted. Hmmm that facade tho... do ya see an issue cutting the track, locking garage door, and putting a framed and insulated wall behind the garage? I could always remove subfloor and wall and replace track to convert back for reselling? – Caleb Ayres Sep 4 '18 at 3:37
  • That's basically what I would suggest. Take down the opener, lock the door and build your wall on the exterior side. You can even remove some of the track (or angle grind it off). My wife and I bypassed several houses that had rendered the garage virtually unusable but YMMV. Not every area needs cars. – Machavity Sep 4 '18 at 3:47
  • Ok, just in-case , though, if we can’t find a way to make that wall look good with the red brick on exterior, do you see an issue with the wall being built on the interior side of door? Code issue maybe? – Caleb Ayres Sep 4 '18 at 11:25
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    I would definitely check local codes. In many areas it is a violation to have a door or window blocked or inoperable. The reason being emergency personal could waste time trying to gain access thru a door or window that is boarded shut. – mikes Sep 4 '18 at 12:36
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I had a similar issue but in a cold climate. I thought about putting an insulated wall inside and under the garage door. making a small space to heat and be completely insulated. In the end, I found it was easier just to insulated the door. you can take off the back panels and spray poly in them. it's not a big job.

The major issue i found was having to build a dropdown ceiling below where the garage door opens and being able to insulate that. Depending on the span of your garage you might need 2x6's or even 2x8's to pass code if you have no support in the middle. maybe some sistered. This is going to be costly and you lose too much space overhead as you are already down under the "ceiling door area".

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I had a neighbour whom finished his garage. He built a wall 2ft in front of the garage door and had the whole garage insulated. Garage door still operated by the opener. That way his garden tools still had a spot to hang up. Probably a bit of framing involved.

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