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I have a double-bowl, stainless steel kitchen sink mounted to a granite countertop, with a faucet with a pull-out spray head (pictured).

faucet

The faucet is no longer tightly mounted, so it wobbles back and forth. I'd like to tighten it. Unfortunately, it's not obvious to me how to tighten it. Here's a picture of the underside:

mounting bracket on underside of faucet

There aren't any obvious screws. All I can guess is that the nut around that brass threaded pipe is how to tighten it? Is tightening that the right way to go? And do you think I can get it tight enough just with that? Or should I expect to have to do something extra (plumber's putty?)?

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the nut around that brass threaded pipe is how to tighten it? Is tightening that the right way to go?

YES and YES

do you think I can get it tight enough just with that? Or should I expect to have to do something extra (plumber's putty?)

YES and NO - you should go ahead and try tightening it up with the nut, it should work. Those types of faucets normally have a gasket under the upper portion and no plumbers putty is required.

NOTE- it will likely be difficult to tighten that nut, most of those types of faucets come with a manufacturer-supplied special tool to reach up and tighten the nut with. If you don't have that tool then you will need to improvise.

enter image description here

  • Yeah, it wasn't obvious to me how to tighten that nut. I'll go looking for the tool - hopefully I can find it. Thanks. – Dathan Jul 13 '18 at 22:09
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    I recently put in a new faucet like that, and the sprayer hose had a quick snap connector on it, that you attached after you tightened that nut, with their supplied plastic deep socket tool. You may need to disconnect the hose to get a good shot at it. Otherwise you are looking for a tool called a basin wrench. – DaveM Jul 13 '18 at 23:37
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That brass nut is what I'd try if you can reach it. It looks like some sort of makeshift clamp blocks access to the nut.

Is that silicone rubber all over one of the fittings? That is non standard and suggests either there was a leak or someone didn't know what they were doing in the first place. There are two corrugated hoses which probably have some sort of quick connect/disconnect. The disconnection process can be tricky. These should be easy to temporarily remove for access, but the presence of the silicone rubber and the makeshift clamp suggests there might be problems.

  • I don't think it's any kind of rubber - it has a greasy texture. – Dathan Jul 13 '18 at 22:06
  • OK good, it is a grease, hopefully silicone grease designed to lubricate probably a quick connect fitting. Note that these lines (a sprayer?) are not pressurized when the valve is off. Why are there two of these corrugated lines? – Jim Stewart Jul 13 '18 at 23:12

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