0

I have a TED (The Energy Detective) to measure energy levels in my home. I was initially excited with the data that I was getting, but quickly found that it was not sufficient to give a clear enough picture.

Is there a known method for measuring electrical consumption at the outlet level for devices that also reports the data back to a central local server that can show everything in a comprehensive graph? (Essentially a Kill A Watt with networking.)

I'm considering building one (well many of these) myself if necessary and would appreciate any thoughts or input in this regard if you have any. I have about 30 outlets that I need to monitor.

  • 1
    This is off topic as it is asking for product recommendations, but I will give you a hint - look into a device called "Sonoff smart switch", it may do what you are seeking. – Norm Jun 18 '18 at 19:24
1

Huh, I was under the impression that the TED did exactly that. Or is it that the TED unit requires being wired into the breaker panel, as opposed to an individual outlet like the Kill-A-Watt? If it's the individual outlet issue, a lot of the new "smart plugs" that work with an Amazon Echo (Alexa) or Google Home unit come in versions that also track energy usage. That's what the Sonoff" unit mentioned above is. I just bought one to work with my Alexa system, I saw that it also monitors energy use, but I didn't care about that.

  • It's wired to the breaker and so you don't get individual outlet measurements. Hmm, interesting. I'm specifically interested in the energy monitoring without the Google Home / Alexa functionality... – ylluminate Jul 1 '18 at 4:02
0

In answer to your question:

Is there a known method for measuring electrical consumption at the outlet level for devices that also reports the data back to a central local server that can show everything in a comprehensive graph?

Yes there probably a hundred or more companies involved in what is now called "Direct Digital Control" older names are "building automation systems" or "energy management systems". The problem is the initial cost. Originally they were only feasible for large projects, but because of the decrease and now constant use of the microprocessors they are utilized in almost any environment you can imagine. It's only a matter of how much control and information you want and how much do you want to pay for it.

Before anyone could really give you an idea about what system you should use. You would need to give us a lot more detail on what you would want in the system. Usually that comes to us in what is known as a "sequence of operation." In short you need to be very specific about what you actually want, how much is automatic, how much is manual, what kind of reports do you need, what about overrides and what are the default position of each control point, what about alarms, and how it fits into a budget.

Good luck.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.