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What kind of threshold might work for this 1938 exterior door? It's actually an interior door, and it is exposed directly to weather (there's no porch or overhang). If it were modern wood, it would be rotted by now, but it's the good old stuff.

What's new are 1" thick Dricore tiles coming right up to the door, with carpet to follow. The door will be cut short to accommodate the height. But it needs a new threshold.

The subfloor tiles are 1" high, the door is 1 1/2" thick, the distance from door edge to the concrete edge is 4", carpet thickness is tbd.

Outswing Door Needing Threshold enter image description here

The local big box has a product that fits, but with ready-to-rot pine below and really dodgy screws and minimal thermal break:

enter image description here

Or this Pemko product, completely without a thermal barrier: enter image description here

See also exterior door threshold over distinct concrete slabs at different grades

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I would consider using a Pemco threshold, it is the "go to" product for atypical conditions. I have no qualms about modifying a threshold with a table saw to make it fit my conditions

Look on page 151 (RT 3) Type 147_, I would cut the left side edge off to meet the Dricore. I would do the same with the 2813_ on page 152.

I would not cut off the whole left side, just enough before the highest part to cap over the Dricore and leave a little ridge for the carpet to go against. Mind you, this still may not be tall enough to keep the carpet from dragging the bottom of the door without introducing a small angle to raise the threshold even higher help the door swing over the carpet. this has been done before too

  • The Pemco threshold, as mentioned in the question, is nowhere near high enough to account for the insulated floor tiles + carpet. – Bryce Jun 15 '18 at 14:48

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