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I have a Goodman evaporator/gas heating unit that runs the central fan motor constantly after it is powered up a couple of seconds. This happens regardless of what wires are hooked to the control board. Is the board damaged/malfunctioning? How hard is it to buy and put another in? Is it a subunit that is bad? I would hate to think the whole unit has to go because the board died.

All the best,

Mark L.

  • Which model do you have? – SDsolar May 6 '18 at 20:18
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    I am another DYI knuckle head. I solved the problem by making sure all the wires were right and being sure of where each lead ended up being connected to. Thank you so much for caring. – Mark Labash May 7 '18 at 21:41
  • Mark, please post and accept an answer if you like, or delete this question. Abandoned questions are ugly. Take the tour to learn how this site works. – isherwood May 30 at 19:00
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The circuit board is usually easy enough to replace, just match up all the wires. Each brand and model has their own unique way of telling you there is a problem. That is one common way. When a limit switch is open many brands will turn on the fan to let you know there is a problem. There may not be a problem with the board. Does it have an indicator light? It may be flashing you a code that can narrow down the search.

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    If the high temp limit switch opens it keeps the fan running attempting to cool the unit, not to let the consumer know there is a problem. – Tyson May 6 '18 at 10:57
  • Actually it is both since it can happen with any of the limits including the rollout and draft limits. As well as lockouts and stuck pressure switches. Carrier, Payne, Bryant and Day and Night furnaces I know would default to turning the fan on for pretty much all external problems. The engineers seemed to keep changing their minds on this one though since not all iterations did this. – user76730 May 6 '18 at 14:11
  • I am another FYI knuckle head. I solved the problem by making sure all the wires were right and being sure of where each lead ended up being connected to. Thank you so much for caring. – Mark Labash May 7 '18 at 21:42

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