1

My fence line sits on a slab of concrete that separates my house from the neighbor's house. So far, I was able to complete two posts via extracting the post rot and replacing the post in the 4x4 slots in the concrete slab.

However there is one slot that is very slanted.

Slanted Fence Post Slot

Here is another picture of me holding a metal bar upright against the slanted concrete as the fence post would naturally be fit(Not letting it lean with gravity):

Holding Bar in Fence Slot

Given that this concrete slab is very large and would be a large task to break-up.

  1. My first idea was to pour concrete into this slot, level it to the main slab, and install a Simpson Strong Tie Fence Post Base to which I would put the new 4x4 in.

  2. Another thought was to shave enough off a 4x4 post so that it would fit in the natural leaning position, and then use a couple of E-Z Fence Post Menders to properly support it.

I'm wondering what other options I have for the DIYer. Both of these options sound like I might be headed in the wrong direction.

Thanks in advance.

2

How many of these posts do you want to replace? Where I live most people are now using round tubular galvanized steel posts about 2-3/8" OD instead of 4x4" cedar or pressure treated. There are special brackets for the rails that clamp around the poles. These poles do come in different grades (wall thicknesses) and in your case I would think a better grade would be appropriate since removal from concrete in these 4x4" holes would be very difficult compared to poles in holes in the ground even set in concrete.

If you put those galvanized round poles in the 4x4 holes, there would be enough play to get them plumb and then pour in concrete. There is also a kind of polymer foam for posts which is touted to be secure, but more workable than concrete. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Sika-33-fl-oz-Fence-Post-Mix-483503/205671519

  • Thanks for the advice! I think this approach sounds much easier than what I was planning to do. – Jon Douglas Apr 23 '18 at 22:22
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    This is exactly what I did for this one post. It was actually quite an easy solution. Thanks for the idea! – Jon Douglas Oct 3 '18 at 4:56
  • Did you use concrete or the foam to hold the post? – Jim Stewart Oct 3 '18 at 8:15
  • Ended up with some quickcrete fence post concrete that settles really fast. – Jon Douglas Oct 3 '18 at 14:11

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