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I have 4 can lights operated by one switch. The light bulb went out. When I replaced it the new one, it went out immediately. This happened three times. I changed the can fixture and the same thing happened?? The other three lights still are good.

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    put one of the three good ones in the fixture – jsotola Mar 8 '18 at 0:41
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    What kind of bulbs are you using? Have you checked the voltage at the can which is burning out bulbs? (This can be tricky, you can short out the fixture, have a big spark and trip the breaker.) If the center connection in the socket is not making good contact, this could conceivably cause local heating and damage the delicate electronics in the base of an LED, but I don't know if this actually occurs. – Jim Stewart Mar 8 '18 at 1:29
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    Easiest way to check voltage in a lamp socket is to screw in a socket to outlet adapter into it, then check the prongs. – Harper Mar 8 '18 at 4:02
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    Are the burnt out bulbs different in any way from the bulbs that work? Maybe dimmable vs. non-dimmable? Different wattage? Different bulb type? – mrog Mar 8 '18 at 20:40
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    Test new bulbs somewhere else first. That may help to distinguish if if is the bulbs or the circuit / fixture which is the problem. – DaveInCaz Mar 9 '18 at 20:52
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If the replacement lamps are the correct voltage, but burning out immediately, this is likely due to a bad neutral connection. This can be caused by a break in the neutral wire anywhere between the outside power transformer and the electric entrance panel in the house. Occasionally, a tree branch will fall on the entrance cable, pulling loose the neutral wire.

This condition causes voltage to be split unequally across circuits, so that some devices may get just a fraction of the normal voltage (e.g. 120 VAC in most of North America), and the opposite circuit get the rest 9up to 240 VAC).

If you know how to check the voltage safely on the bulb's circuit you can confirm this. In any event, if it is a bad neutral, get it fixed quickly, because the incorrect voltage (low as well as high) can destroy appliances or start a fire. This repair is not for the amateur, and may require inspection afterwards.

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    Multiple lights on the same circuit if it was a neutral issue they would all blow as they are in parallel. – Ed Beal Mar 9 '18 at 19:12
  • @EdBeal I agree with you, assuming all the bulbs are identical. However, the OP hasn't stated that yet. So, let's stay tuned. – mrog Mar 9 '18 at 22:24
  • The lamps could be different wattages as long as they are the correct voltage there should not be a problem, I was thinking incandesant as I have had this problem. – Ed Beal Mar 9 '18 at 22:44
  • The lamps could be different wattages as long as they are the correct voltage there should not be a problem, I was thinking incandesant as I have had this problem. – Ed Beal Mar 9 '18 at 22:44
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I have had a similar problem with 100 w bulbs I bought (several cases) before they were outlawed (except for the heavy duty ones) I have had a few fail right away I believe the seal on the lamp must have been bad and allowed some air in because the filament burned not just opened like normal failures.

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When incandescent lamps became "illegal", the big mfrs basically got out of the business. So the only incandescent lamps you can still buy are coming in from China, India and other places with little or no quality controls. If you can buy it in a "Dollar Store", it isn't worth even one dollar...

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