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I'm trying to hang a 60lb tankless water heater in my basement against an exterior wall and trying to figure out if I can get away with 2" x 2" pine furring strips and some plywood.

Assuming minimal knots, What is the maximum amount of weight I should assume an 8' 2" x 2" can bear at center (4' high) if attached to a secured floor plate and overhead joist?

Thanks!

closed as unclear what you're asking by isherwood, ThreePhaseEel, mmathis, Daniel Griscom, Machavity Mar 15 '18 at 12:19

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    There’s 2x2’s will be mounted to the wall? What material is the exterior wall made of? How will you attach to the wall? How will you attach to the 2x2’s? What is the weight and capacity of you water heater? A better question would be “Will this configuration work?” or “How would you hang this heater onto this wall?”. – Stanwood Feb 27 '18 at 11:30
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    The answer varies wildly with the actual 2x2. With a board that small, knots can cut load capacity by 90%. At any rate, you're asking about studs. Studs don't carry weight "on center", as they're oriented vertically. Please add more detail to your question so we know what you're trying to do. – isherwood Feb 27 '18 at 15:20
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    fyi a 2x2 isn't a stud, its referred to as a furring strip. Presumably this is secured to a concrete wall or something?? Details please. – agentp Feb 27 '18 at 16:18
  • @Stanwood As per the stack exchange guidelines, I'm trying to avoid subjective questions and instead focus on getting the abstract answers that would provide my self and others the fundamental knowledge needed to solve an array of different but similar problems. – virtualxtc Feb 27 '18 at 22:06
  • @isherwood While crawling the internet I once saw a load bearing chart that gave weight by per foot, as well as max load at center, sadly I can't find it now, and it probably didn't included 'strapping' anyway. – virtualxtc Feb 27 '18 at 22:09
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A typical install would us 2x4's with plywood across. Basically mimic wood stud framing. Doing the same with 2x2's should be fine for this application. I'm assuming a 100lb dead load. Use 23/32" sheathing plywood or MDF. Mount with nuts/bolts into the plywood and framing nails elsewhere. Weak point would be tearout of a connector not deflection of the 2x2 beams. If you are paranoid you can use metal wood ties to enable bolts elsewhere rather than toenails. I think once you hang the 2x2s from floor to ceiling you will see they are plenty strong enough to hold a grown adult.

I included a picture that I think represents what you are trying to do except behind this plywood/frame would be a basement wall with pipes you don't want to attach to.

Example plywood framing

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