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I am attempting to replace 2 ovens that currently each have their own dedicated 20 amp 220v circuits. (12 ga wire)

My new modern GE double oven requires a single 30 amp, 220 circuit. (10 ga wire)

Since they are dedicated wires going to the same place, and my new 30 amp 220 breaker accepts (2) 12 ga wires, can't I just wire these in parallel? Red to Red, Black to Black, White to White? Two 12 ga should theoretically be good up to 40 amps, and I am only going to ask for 30 amps tops.

I know it would be better to pull 50' of dedicated 10 ga cable but it would be very difficult with my home layout. Unless one of the paralleled 12 ga wires spontaneously broke by itself I can't see any danger such as the full load of 30 amp attempting to be carried by the single 12 ga wire?

Or,,,, should I stick with the 4 breakers I currently have, (each 20 amp), and just join them at the connection to the oven... That way each breaker is protecting a single 12ga wire and would trip if any one of them went individually over 20 amps. (it may sound strange but the current configuration has 4 separate 20 amp breakers,,, not 2 legs ganged/joined together.)

I hope that makes sense.. Thanks anyone for your help!!!

Herb

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    It makes sense only when dealing with normal currents, in the event of faults and fault current, it’ll burn your house down. The wire needs to be replaced. – Tyson Feb 15 '18 at 21:03
  • Thank you Tyson,, OK,, I think I understand why paralleling might be bad.. But what about just keeping my (4) 20 amp breakers and just joining the wires at the junction to the oven. Each wire is still protected at it's capacity, and at the oven I should have the 30 amp capacity I need? 2 reds. 2 blacks,2 whites? – Herb G Feb 15 '18 at 21:15
  • No, that won’t work either. Sorry but there is only one thing that works: change the wire. – Tyson Feb 15 '18 at 21:19
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    Thanks again Tyson... I was hoping that this might work.. Even if it isn't truly per code,, I'm not sure how it could be a hazard if each independent leg is separately protected with it's own appropriately sized breaker. – Herb G Feb 15 '18 at 21:24
  • Again, think about a worst case example. I know of someone that had a freak accident with a 4 wheeler in a garage that caused damaged to a wall with the oven and hot tub running through it. If you have a LOOP like you suggest, you're going to burn your house down again!. Code exists for a reason, it's the rules, it's the safe way. – Tyson Feb 15 '18 at 22:23
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In a very simple answer NO. NEC forbids paralleling conductors less than 1/0. Article 310.10 (H)(1)

  • Thanks Retired Master Electrician...OK,, I think I understand why paralleling might be bad.. But what about just keeping my (4) 20 amp breakers and just joining the wires at the junction to the oven. Each wire is still protected at it's capacity, and at the oven I should have the 30 amp capacity I need? 2 reds. 2 blacks,2 whites? – or is there something else I am missing? – Herb G Feb 15 '18 at 21:16
  • @HerbG how do you plan to protect the neutrals? Neutrals are not breakered. – Harper Feb 15 '18 at 21:55
  • @Harper it is a 220V, no neutrals, he should be using double-pole circuit breakers – Dr Yunke Feb 15 '18 at 21:59
  • Ranges usually call for neutral. They're used for the controls and the oven light since 240V bulbs are hard to source here. Oven lights must be incandescent (or, I suppose, HID) because they must be OK with getting rather hot. – Harper Feb 15 '18 at 22:12
  • Hi Harper,, I guess the neutrals are the same as currently installed.. No breakers on them. Just a breaker on each leg of the 220V. But I would expect the breakers to trip if either leg got overloaded. Still not sure why the approach to join the wires at the oven wouldn't work and be safe as well, even if not necessarily per code. – Herb G Feb 15 '18 at 22:23

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