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I'm replacing a bathroom exhaust fan. The previous fan is probably about 30 years old and was not grounded. In fact, the wiring in the bathroom does not have ground. The fan will be mounted to a steel stud in the ceiling. Are steel studs grounded or do I need to worry about the stud potentially holding a charge?

The bathroom is in a steel frame high-rise, if that matters.

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  • Where are you on this planet, and can you post a photo of the inside of the wiring junction box that the bathroom fan is connected to? I suspect that your wiring is grounded, but there's no ground wire due to the building being a conduit job... Feb 11, 2018 at 22:10
  • I'm in the US. I cant see the junction box from where the previous fan was mounted, just the wiring in a flex steel conduit.
    – Matt
    Feb 12, 2018 at 2:31
  • Did the previous fan have a wiring compartment on it? Also, can you post a photo of the free end of the wiring that formerly went to the old fan? Feb 12, 2018 at 2:38
  • It did not, just the wire nuts directly connecting the wires. These connect to an outlet in the case of the fan that you plug the motor into. Just like this: amazon.com/dp/B073X7P42F/ref=asc_df_B073X7P42F5367668/…
    – Matt
    Feb 12, 2018 at 2:49
  • Can you post a photo of the free end of the wiring that formerly went to the old fan? Feb 12, 2018 at 3:44

2 Answers 2

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If you choose a class-II (double-insulated) fan you won't need to add the ground wire.

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I found that my home,built in the "70's,has plastic boxes in the wall but there is a metal strip on them hard to see and that has a copper wire that runs back to the breaker panel.

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