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We just repainted the wall and fixed the plaster last November due to water damage. Recently, I discovered that there appears to have some water damage on the wall again. This damage is right below a window. But the window has been closed the entire winter.

Can anyone help me to figure out what is the source of water damage?

I checked the exterior and couldn't find anything that needs repair including the tuck-point. Can it be condensation? The window curtain is also closed at all time which may make the condensation worse.

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Below is the first time we had water damage last year.

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2/2 Update: I took some photos as Jack recommends. I can see the paint on the exterior window sill needs to be repaired. But could that be the reason? We don't know much about whether if the window is original.But it's an old house and the window seems old.

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Exterior Wall

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  • Is that the paint blistering on the outlet cover???? And bubbles in the paint at the bottom edge of the trim near the top right corner of the outlet? – Jack Feb 2 '18 at 3:50
  • The outlet appears to have plug covers installed with clear tape over them. – Dan D. Feb 2 '18 at 13:00
  • Since you mentioned tuck & point I would be looking at the sill. Water can find its way through brick work quite easily. – Ed Beal Feb 2 '18 at 15:17
  • Dan is right. I cover the outlet. – Rebecca Feb 2 '18 at 20:03
  • The added pictures are great. The sash looks like they may be removed, since it looks to be a double hung window? These are definitely replacement windows, well done from what I can see. The discoloration in the corners tells me something is going on there, The plastic jambs are removable and the lower corners can be tidied up and sealed better, but be careful, the process of sealing, if not done well can create problems the the raising and lowering of the window all the way down, if too much sealant gets built up in the corners. – Jack Feb 13 '18 at 21:32
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The company that I used to work for a few years ago had a saying about windows. There are 2 kinds of windows, windows that will leak, and windows that are leaking.

If you have the original windows to the house, some separation may have occurred at the sill level. whether it is at the corner where the side jamb meets the sill or where the sill meets the finished window sill or even someplace else.

Your problem is defiantly still water intrusion. Was before and still is. Since there is no pictures of the window itself, there is not a lot to go on. If the windows were replaced with new inserts. It may be where the new and old meet, or because of it. It is all still a guess with out more pictures. Need a few at the inside of the window jamb with the window open, at the inside corners and outside focused on the sill.

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That could be moisture vapor moving through the wall, a leak in the exterior building envelope that is making its way under the window sill and being wicked by the insulation to the interior wall, or was perhaps sealed in when you painted over not fully dry plaster.

Based on the upper photo, it is very likely that the plaster was not fully dry but that is also what plaster looks like that was applied to concrete that wicks in moisture.

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