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I had two steel table legs fabricated for a dining table. It is made from flat steel of size 80mm x 8mm (3.15in x 0.3in). It looks like a rounded square and the size of each leg is 700mm x 700mm (27.5in x 27.5in) . When I tried to attach a wooden table top, I noticed a bit of wobble. The wooden table top is around 1500mm x 800mm x 50mm (59 x 31 x 2 in)and weighs around 30kg (66lbs). I was thinking of adding three cross supports to prevent this wobble. Would this be a way to do it? Or can someone perhaps suggest a better type of support for connecting both legs? Many thanks!

Original table legs Table legs with support

  • Have you determined if it's the fabrication of the legs which is at fault or if your wooden table-top is a little warped? – brhans Jan 31 '18 at 23:04
  • Hi, the table top is air dried cedar which to the best of my knowledge is straight (sighted down the edge). The legs seem to be welded well on visual inspection, but beyond that I dont know how to determine if they are faulty. Perhaps I needed a more thicker bar (12mm or 16mm)? – Drad Jan 31 '18 at 23:21
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You have to think in terms of triangles when resolving issues like this. The upper inside corners of your leg frames want triangle type corner braces. You also want to have triangle braces from each leg frame up to the underside of the table. Done properly this will eliminate all of the wobble.

  • L brackets would work, or a shelf bracket, depends on how you want it to look. – Jeff Cates Feb 1 '18 at 5:58
  • L Brackets are crap and are NOT triangular like what is needed here. – Michael Karas Feb 1 '18 at 6:52
  • Depends on your L bracket. Heavy gauge steel, bolted 3 on each leg and table top would prevent to table from wobbling. And an L bracket would create an open triangle. Yes still a triangle just with 2 sides. – Jeff Cates Feb 1 '18 at 6:56
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This might upset your design, but if you skewed the legs a small amount (say, +10 degrees, -10 degrees) off of perpendicular, it might provide enough triangulation to prevent the wobble. (This assumes the wobble is in the long direction...)

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