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Helllo i just got a firestorm black and decker 10 inch mitre saw off one of my buddies for free because he upgraded. I was looking at some videos (none for this saw) and i couldn't figure out how to get the blade off. i put a wrench on the nut and turned clockwise but i don't know if it a clockwise or counter clockwise nut can anybody help? (Black and Decker firestorm 10" mitre saw)

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If the model number is correct, or even close to it, this may be useful for you:

Firestorm FS100L miter saw manual

From that link, I found this set of images that are sure to be useful:

blade change pictures

A bit more digging in the manual shows this text:

WARNING:DISCONNECT MACHINE FROM POWER SOURCE!

  1. Remove screw (A) Fig. 41 and rotate cover (B) to the rear (Fig. 42).
  2. To remove the saw blade, insert the hex wrench (C) Fig. 43 into the hex hole located on the rear end of the motor shaft to keep the shaft from turning.
  3. Use a wrench (D) Fig. 44 to loosen the arbor screw (E) by turning it clockwise.
  4. Remove the arbor screw (E) Fig. 44, the outside blade flange (B), and the saw blade from the saw arbor.
  5. Attach the new saw blade making certain that the teeth of the saw blade are pointing down (Fig. 44). Place the outside blade flange (F) on the arbor, and attach the arbor screw (E) by turning it counter-clockwise using the wrench (D). At the same time, use the hex wrench (C) Fig. 43 to keep the arbor from turning.
  6. Rotate the cover back to the front and replace the screw that was removed in STEP 1.

WARNING:Remove wrenches (C) Fig. 43 and (D) Fig. 44 before starting machine.

Step 3 confirms reverse thread on the bolt holding the blade, turn clockwise (analog, not digital) to loosen.

  • that last warning is priceless! – agentp Jan 7 '18 at 2:48
  • Turning right or left would depend on if the handle is at 12 o'clock position or 6 o'clock position that's why we use cw & ccw. Other than that it is a good answer. – Ed Beal Jan 7 '18 at 12:16
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Easy to remember I think, you loosen the screw turning in the blade's cutting direction. Typically clockwise for miter saws and counter clockwise for hand held circular saws. They need to be that way so the motor doesn't tend to loosen the screw while cutting.

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