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I have two outlets that have the lower outlet controlled by a wall switch. The red wire is the switch. I am trying to swap these out with an outlet that has only spots for black white and ground and I have no need for them to be controlled by the switch any longer. What do I do with the red wire?

  • cap the red wire at both ends – jsotola Dec 30 '17 at 20:08
  • You could reuse the old receptacle by just using a short piece of wire as a jumper across the two screws on the hot side in place of the broken off tab. Or use two short pigtails, one to each screw, from the black wire. – Jim Stewart Dec 30 '17 at 22:42
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Just wire nut off the red wire and push it into the back of the box. You should remove that switch and safe-up that wire on that end also. You can purchase a snap -in blank to go in you plate.

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  • Yes, do not drywall over the junction box unless all live wires are physically removed. And throw some electrical tape on that wire-nut to hold it in place, they often fall off single wires. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Dec 30 '17 at 22:20
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Sorry, this isn't an answer, but good pictures of this are rare. See what's circled in red? (or rather, what's absent there?)

enter image description here

That's the broken-off tab that you must break off when you want to split a receptacle for separate control. Notice how this is on the hot side. (it's rare to want to split the neutral side.)

We get so many questions about malfunctions when people swap receptacles without doing this. That's what it looks like when you do it right.

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Looks like a multi wire configuration. The tab broken was to make it a as separate circuits - check the breaker box make sure the are on separate phases and it on a double pole breaker. They are probably sharing the neutral.

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  • Possibly. But far more likely it's just a half-switched outlet config. I mean we know it's half-switched because OP says so. It's unusual for the switched leg to be served off a different breaker and from an opposite pole, not impossible. – Harper - Reinstate Monica Dec 31 '17 at 1:17

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