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I need a stainless steel double bowl kitchen sink (33 × 22, standard size). All the ones I see have these rails under the edge. This is to clamp the sink to the counter.

The hole I have cut is a bit too small so the sinks with rails won't drop in as the rails prevent that. Is there a stainless steel sink that doesn't have the rails underneath but some other way to clamp?

I really can't modify the hole for this project. Am I stuck with acrylic?

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    All have the clamp rails that i know of. There may be a sink that has the capacity to drop in or under mount that does not have the rails. Otherwise I would not hesitate to cut the opening bigger, no matter what the material is. With care, it can be done – Jack Dec 27 '17 at 22:23
  • Opening is tile already installed of course. TIle on wood I think. I just really don't want to break the tile because I don't have any replacements. Previous owners didn't leave scrap. The acrylic sink fit fine but it was white and chipping. – Robb Dec 27 '17 at 23:09
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I got a Dremel with a cutting wheel and cut one rail off. As I was finishing that one off I discovered I could peel what was left off with a pair of needlenosed plyers. Think opening a can of spam. On the next rail I used the needlenose to pry the rail open and give the Dremel more room to work. I heard a couple of the spot wields pop. Wiggled the rail back and forth somemore and... presto. It popped right off. Time to remove the first rail - 1 hour (had to keep letting the Dremel cool down). Time to remove the next three rails - five minutes. Be sure the sink edge is well supported so you don't bend it if you try this.

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Formica countertop. I took a hammer and tapped along the outer rails, bending them in slightly. Dropped right into the hole but was still a tad too big so I used a bastard file to take off a litle from the countertop. The sink then dropped right in and no issues with getting the screws into the rails.

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I have worked for many years in kitchen counters and sinks. We sometimes came across this problem when customers wanted a new sink but cutting the granite opening larger was impractical or too costly. The rail you talk about, as you say holds the sink clips and were often not even used on granite (especially in the early days when the clips were useless on a hard surface) The easiest way we found around this was to simply cut them off and bond in the sink with silicone. Bonding in this way is still very common. We used to use a 4 1/2" grinder. The metal will "blue" as you cut and you don't want it showing on the surface so use an ultra thin blade and only cut off what you need and don't cut it off tight to the drainer. You can bond the sink in using a bead of silicone around the sink and the imaginative use of clamps, or easier still, weigh it down overnight with some building blocks. Use some paper or cloth under the blocks to stop the sink getting marked. If your sink has a rubber sealing strip stuck to it, cut this off first for a snug fit.

locked by Community Jan 2 '18 at 12:42
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