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I have a fan in my bathroom, but it appears to be dead. I took the fan apart, the "fan" is a motor piece which has a standard (US) two prong plug that you just plug into the fan outlet. The outlet works fine, I plugged a wall lamp into and it's ok.

I'm trying to get a replacement motor piece now, the unit has the following written on it:

Broan NuTone LLC
99080351
SP-61K20
120V/60Hz 0.9A

There are some other numbers on it that just look like serial numbers, I did a search for "SP-61K20", and there are some matching results. The power section is a little different though, they read:

120V/60Hz 1.2A

Is there amperage difference a problem? I figured since it's plugging into a standard outlet it shouldn't matter, but wanted to check.

Thanks

closed as off-topic by ThreePhaseEel, Daniel Griscom, BMitch Dec 27 '17 at 11:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking product or service recommendations are off-topic because they tend to become obsolete quickly. Instead, describe your situation and the specific problem you're trying to solve." – ThreePhaseEel, Daniel Griscom, BMitch
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • This is off topic as a shopping question. However I’ll point you the right direction, order it from the Broan Online Factory Parts Store – Tyson Dec 26 '17 at 22:45
  • I disagree with this being off topic. The question could be reworded a bit to remove references to shopping, but the general question is just about the amperage. The correct answer is the one posted below, the higher amperage is from this being a more powerful fan, but everything is still low enough that you won't have any issues. – TFK Dec 27 '17 at 17:22
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In this case, the amperage does not matter. What you've got there is a slightly more powerful fan.

A typical outlet is on a 15 or 20 amp circuit. You can safely turn on devices adding up to 80% of the capacity. Thus even with your fan running you've got 90% of the capacity of a 15 amp circuit left for other devices.

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