2

I'm building a new house and can't afford the cameras now, but I want to install the boxes on the exterior of the house and run Cat6 cable to them for PoE IP cameras at a later date. It is much easier to install boxes and cable (also the cheapest part) while the siding and drywall and insulation are not in place.

The boxes will be mounted on the wall (not under the eves), and probably about 8' off the ground so they can get faces, but not be in reach for tampering without a ladder.

But, without knowing what specific model of camera I'll get (and models will change as time goes on), should I install one-gang rectangular, two-gang rectangular, or 4" round boxes like the kind used for exterior light fixtures?

Is one type of box preferred over another, or is it adaptable later where it doesn't matter?

  • All things being equal, a two-gang rectangular box is probably the most versatile. – Steve Dec 7 '17 at 14:27
  • A single gang "square" box is fine, at my plant we use single gang and a weather proof cover plate with a 1/2" hole this makes mounting the camera very easy and the cameras we use mount on a flange or remove the flange and screw into the cover, really works well and looks nice. – Ed Beal Dec 7 '17 at 19:59
  • A single gang "square" box is fine, at my plant we use single gang and a weather proof cover plate with a 1/2" hole this makes mounting the camera very easy and the cameras we use mount on a flange or remove the flange and screw into the cover, really works well and looks nice. – Ed Beal Dec 7 '17 at 19:59
2

All the ones I've seen seem to be sized for installation on a light box. You want to use as shallow a box as you can get away with so you don't decrease the wall insulation. If you use the really shallow ones, you might be able to surface mount them on the sheathing over the tyvek.

Do you even need a box? If the camera is PoE, you're running low voltage and tiny currents.

I think your best bet is to look up some of the cameras, then go to the Mfgs website, and read the installation guide.

Don't put them all at 8 feet. That's really easy to hit with a spray can of paint. Mind you: Any camera is subject to a paint ball gun

You can often find dummy cameras. These can give a bit of false security while you are waiting to afford the others, and they can mark the places where your cable comes through the wall.

Place one camera where it can read the license plate, both coming and going.

Place at least one camera where it can get a good face shot of someone leaving the house. These cameras are much more difficult to scout, and most thieves aren't actively looking for surveillance on their way out.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.