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I had to remove the panel for my shower to get at the pipes behind it. I cut a square around the panel in the drywall to take it out - now I need to fill in the gaps between the panel and the rest of the wall. I want to cut drywall to fill in the holes and then putty them together however I need a way to attach the drywall to the studs at the top, and the panel side on the right. Does anyone have any goods ideas on how to do this? Obviously I don't want to screw it in since it will show on the outside.

thanks,

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First, know that drywall tape joints are actually quite strong. If you leave a 1/8" gap between panels so that joint compound can achieve full depth, there's little you need to do in that location. There will be virtually no pressure on it there.

I'd float some scrap lumber between the studs in the middle to reduce the span by half, and maybe at the upper left. 4" lengths of 1x2 or plywood will do.

You could also use the hemmed edge of a drywall sheet for even more strength. It doesn't look like the wall was furred out for the flange, so I'm not sure how things will fit, but doing so might benefit by it being a thinner piece.

  • so right side: Drywall tape + spackle. top: add more surface area, tape and spacke? – jacksonecac Dec 4 '17 at 15:18
  • Really not sure what that means. :) You need to fill in the drywall all the way around, IMO, then tape it. "Spackle" isn't involved. Joint compound. – isherwood Dec 4 '17 at 15:38
  • does the tape go over the drywall or behind it? if it goes in front, how do you stop it from showing afterwards? I have never used drywall tape so I am not sure how it is used. – jacksonecac Dec 4 '17 at 15:39
  • You'll want to research drywall taping. It's outside the scope of this thread, and there's a universe of information on it to be had. – isherwood Dec 4 '17 at 15:49
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however I need a way to attach the drywall to the studs at the top, and the panel side on the right. Does anyone have any goods ideas on how to do this? Obviously I don't want to screw it in since it will show on the outside.

Dry wall screws (or nails) are always set deeper then the surface of the dry wall. Then using joint compound you fill in the dimple left by the screw and you never see it. I would put 2 - 3 screws into the top patch, but I love using my dry wall screw gun.

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I've seen people backup that top part with 1/4 or 3/8, and bring it out with DuraBond, then top coat to finish.

If it were me, I'd go out to the corner, 12" above, and at least out to the next stud, then hang as normal. It's going to be a pain, to piece work around that tub surround, with small pieces, and dealing with the different surface depths.

Sister a board in the corner, and at the next stud, so you aren't putting screws right on the edge of your patch pieces.

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