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I am framing a basement and have been working at my own pace. Because of this some of the pressure treated boards I purchased have developed a twist to them.

I don't want to go through all the trouble of framing a portion and securing it and having it not come out correctly.

When I fasten the frame to the foundation will it straighten out the green board? Is this something I should even worry about?

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It's not really a concern within reason. I wouldn't try to use a board with more than a 3/4" lift. Cut those up and use them in shorter walls, or simply cut them into sections between studs and fasten them to the slab appropriately.

You haven't said what type of fasteners you're using, but most will flatting the plates out if you also apply pressure to the plate as you attach it. Even white lumber often has slight twists, and it's not really a problem.

You also have pressure from above to work with in many cases. Cut your studs accurately and let the joists force the wall down.

  • Great, thank you. I'll be using the hammer drill with anchors and screws/washers to secure them. I assumed that this would help pull them flat, but didn't want to do all the work and have it still be twisted. I'll also come back to this question when I have enough rep and select it as the correct answer. – SSharp Nov 14 '17 at 17:40
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Sometimes you can get away with this. However depending on how bad the lumber has warped, sometimes you can't. You will know when you can't when in the process the lumber splits and breaks. Also you will incur additional labor and hardware costs. The overall quality of the job can be affected by sub-standard lumber.
Note to self: Always when purchasing new lumber, lay flat and stack to avoid warping. If you know it will be awhile before you can get to it, you can weight your stacks. Additionally, try to keep the lumber from drying out before it is framed into place.

  • I did have them stack, but a couple still twisted. Must not have been enough weight. Thanks. – SSharp Nov 14 '17 at 17:41
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Typically if you're trying to secure a board to concrete, you can usually fasten the board down on one end, and then work your way to the other end, putting fasteners in as you go, also bending your board to line up with your chalk line as you go. This is called worming, and has never let me down.

  • Great thank you. I'll give it a shot as I go. – SSharp Nov 17 '17 at 22:42

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