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I have very specific practical question. Which way a pipe will last the longest and less corrosion will appear inside (internally) the pipe while it last? 1 I have one shower water IRON pipe, the question is it good idea to leave water inside the shower pipe after each use (use shower almost every other day) or let it out (through the faucet) ? 2 I have another shower water COPPER pipe, the question is it good idea to leave water inside the shower pipe after each use (use shower almost every other day) or let it out (through the faucet) ? Thanks a lot

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    Hopefully all questions on this site should be both specific and practical. You should edit the title to reflect your actual question. – agentp Nov 12 '17 at 19:02
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The water can stand in the shower riser between showers without ill effect, however dumping the water after each shower is also a common practice and results in little or no long term effects. Both are acceptable and common practice.

  • Though if copper and iron pipe are connected together, there can be galvanic corrosion of the iron when allowed to stay wet. – Mark Jan 25 '18 at 23:35
  • I would say no possibility of a dry pipe with copper, but possibly some galvanic corrosion if left full. With iron I could go either direction, if left full the zinc not the pipes will be slowly etched and or solids from the water can build up (over 26p0 years). Or if drained air could get to the metal and rust (again over 20 years). So I don't think it really would matter with iron but copper I would drain to prevent galvanic corrosion. – Ed Beal Jan 26 '18 at 6:58
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It depends mostly on the water. A mildly scaling water will put a thin , protective scale in the pipes; no corrosion problems. A soft acidic water ( rain or many river waters ) will cause some corrosion ; the copper is likely to last longer than you. Steel ( eg Sch.40 ) may require replacement in 20 years. Letting them empty and dry periodically probably does not accelerate the corrosion. A water softener would make the corrosion worse. Shower extensions in the US are usually brass -about the same corrosion as copper in this case.

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