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Model Number

Exhaust vent

When I moved in a two years ago this heater wasn't working. Turns out the tree roots crushed the gas line. When I did my patio I had a new gas line put in. The heater fires up and runs good. The prior owner removed the vent when he replaced the roof. I can't find an oval vent to connect to this. It's 3" high by approximately 4 1/2" wide. Do I bend a single wall 4" vent to fit and connect the Class B vent to the single wall or does someone make an oval vent?

  • Yes, you squeeze the 4" round duct to fit over the oval pipe – d.george Oct 27 '17 at 17:43
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A common way is with a single wall oval to round elbow. Then you use a listed adapter for joining single-wall vent to Type B round vent. Do not "squeeze" or "bend" a pipe, fitting, or adapter to make it fit.

Contrary to some things you might hear, gas fired appliance vent pipes and fittings must be fit for purpose and used according to code and manufacturers' instructions or you could have a fire or die from CO poisoning. There are all kinds of restrictions; length and slope of horizontal runs, number and degree of bends, requirements by space/area, passing through floors/walls/roof, height of vent stack, type of cap, etc. All the rules are there for a reason (usually the reason is that someone was injured or killed).

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  • To jimmy Fix-it, that heater is probably older than you are and squeezing the connecting flue pipe was the way it was done when this dinosaur was built. Looking at the motor and heater construction this thing is an antique and I would look for a replacement rather than using it If the Writer really wants to use this heater I would call a licensed HVAC company to check this unit carefully for chamber integrity. The fitting you show may work but you have to squeeze the round end to get it installed. According to the name plate this thing was made in Oct. 1967 – d.george Oct 28 '17 at 10:38
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To jimmy Fix-it, that heater is probably older than you are and squeezing the connecting flue pipe was the way it was done when this dinosaur was built. Looking at the motor and heater construction this thing is an antique and I would look for a replacement rather than using it If the Writer really wants to use this heater I would call a licensed HVAC company to check this unit carefully for chamber integrity. The fitting you show may work but you have to squeeze the round end to get it installed. According to the name plate this thing was made in Oct. 1967 – d.george 11 mins ago

  • Good point; yes the firebox should be checked. I didn't take the time to check the plate, indeed that is an old unit. I have seen and feel relatively comfortable with ad-hoc flue duct adaptation on vertical runs, less so on horizontal connections. hard to tell orientation from the pics though. – Jimmy Fix-it Oct 28 '17 at 17:24
  • In the photo you can see the heat exchanger has no rust, looking from the bottom up there's none on the inside either. The burner is cast iron and there's no rust on that either. I had it running for a few minutes and it has a nice even blue flame. The only time I plan to use it is if I have to fix my car or the snowblower so hopefully my use will be limited. I will get it checked out, the local HVAC guy is honest and very reasonable.. – Platinum Goose Oct 30 '17 at 18:12
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Side note: The heater looks very old. Please check to make sure the exchanger is still in good shape. Thanks.

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