1

I've recently had new kitchen cabinets installed in my kietchen. I'd like to install a new backsplash as well, the old one has been removed as shown in the picture below: enter image description here

My question is - should i sand off or further remove the thinset in order to properly install a new backsplash, or is the old dried thinset still OK to leave on there without issue?

  • What is the "new backsplash" going to be? Larger tiles or panels will be much more forgiving than an intricate mosaic tile. – JPhi1618 Oct 24 '17 at 19:57
  • @JPhi1618 My current thought would be to have subway tile surrounded by some 1"x2" glass tiles centered around the outlets. 3x6 subway tile perhaps. Not fully decided yet, but your feedback is helpful – CrimsonX Oct 24 '17 at 19:58
  • @JPhi1618 My current thought would be to have subway tile surrounded by some 1"x2" glass tiles centered around the outlets. 3x6 subway tile perhaps. Not fully decided yet, but your feedback is helpful – CrimsonX Oct 24 '17 at 20:00
  • Well, I'm looking for an answer too, but I knew that detail would be important. Getting all that off the wall would probably be best, but that's a lot of hard work because of the delicate sheetrock. I wonder if a skim-coat of mortar to even things out would be enough? – JPhi1618 Oct 24 '17 at 20:01
1

I installed subway tile with an accent strip around the top in a bathroom, and the drywall was severely damaged from removing the previous tile. I ended up doing a skim coat of drywall mud (there was not any thin set mortar left, just chunks and gouges out of the drywall from taking off the old tile with paper torn off everywhere) then painting it to seal the mud and finally sanding it a little to give the thinset a dull surface to adhere to instead of a glossy surface.

If you do try to scrape off the thin set, a bent angle painters' scraper that is used to remove wallpaper works great. If you are going to try a skim coat with mortar, you probably will have to bring the outlets out a little to compensate for the added thickness. Originally I was going to use glass tiles for the accent pieces on my wall, but the contractor I hired to set the tub told me that they are terrible to cut and they show wall imperfections behind them, so I don’t have any experience with working with those.

  • Not a bad idea to do a skim cote of drywall mud. I can do that. – CrimsonX Oct 26 '17 at 13:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.