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I am redecorating my house and chose a Kartell Bourgie lamp in white/gold for the living room. I'd like to paint the walls of the living room the same kind of white of the lamp.

Since the white is not a pure white but looks more like a silk white, could anyone please point me out to the correct RAL colour code?

closed as off-topic by Chris Cudmore, mmathis, ThreePhaseEel, Ed Beal, Machavity Oct 13 '17 at 17:52

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  • Why not ask the maker of the lamp? – Fizz Oct 12 '17 at 16:05
  • @Fizz: they are extremely slow in replying: I'd like to have my house finished by Christmas ;-) – Pierpaolo Oct 13 '17 at 9:19
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Once you have the RAL code for that color, you're going to need to translate that to a company-specify color when you go to the paint shop. I'd suggest that you take the lamp to the paint shop and have them directly match the color.

They may be able to match it by eye, but many paint shops now have electronic sensors that will give them a paint mix to match, and that is much more likely to actually match than trying to do it through color code specifications.

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RAL has 490 colors in their Effect system. The eye has about a million.

You can't pick any random object in the world and go "what's its RAL code". That only works on things originally manufactured to a RAL code.

What's more, if you walk into your local building supply and say you want RAL 1234, they're going to say (say it with me, colorists, we've all been there) "bring me a sample". Now you're sending off to RAL for a swatch.

If you can find a 30mm square area that is the color you want, you can take the artifact into a paint store and they can scan it with their XRite scanner and develop a formula.

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