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fall is coming and the cheap T-11 siding on my garage has dissolved along the bottom just below and above the sill pate on both sides - it will do the same in the front shortly as the siding comes low to the ground because the foundation is non existent on the front of a garage, and only a few inches on the sides - yikes.

I'm a 57 yr.old woman so the answers need to be DIY :)

I would like to cut off the siding by 4' up (there are a couple of holes) and replace with a water proof and price friendly material. The walls are open 2x4 studs on 24" centers (oh the lingo I pick up around here :)

Q - Is there a way to better seal T-111 so it can repel water? Use primer on the sides and inside is what a guy at homedepot said he did....

Prince is an issue as the side walls are both 26' feet, and the front is 32'.

One other thing - the side that is the worst is the west - setting sun side.

Thank you for all you wisdom and ideas,

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  • Keeping the dirt level at 6" below the sideing is important. If you cut the bottom off you will want to add Z flashing behind the original siding and slide the new material up behind the flashing this will keep the water outside and protect the top of the new material from water on the cut edge.
    – Ed Beal
    Sep 13 '17 at 1:07
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Well after lots of research - I am going to seal new T-111 and replace the lower 4' on both sides, then I'm going to use the Hardy siding on the front where more insurance is needed.

In both cases I'm using a good moisture wrap - Felt Buster and adding pressure treated 2x6 sections in-between each stud to secure the new materials to. This will lock the wall with the siding helping stabilize everything.

Lots of info on fixing T-111 on Youtube.com

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  • If the original material dissolved, it was likely immersed in water or wet soil. It's critical to solve that problem before sticking another material there. T-111 is pretty weather-proof, but not immersion-proof or designed for ground contact. Hardy Plank is made of layers of cement and cardboard. It will also disintegrate if immersed or in ground contact. You may want to consider PVC paneling, which is designed to handle almost anything. Companies like Azek make products sold at building supply stores. Home Depot and Lowes may have in-house brands. (cont'd)
    – fixer1234
    Sep 19 '17 at 3:26
  • Reversible sheets that look like T-111 on one side and beadboard on the other are common. 4' x 8' sheets are a standard size and would match your project.
    – fixer1234
    Sep 19 '17 at 3:26
  • Hum, as far as I have seen the siding wasn't in soil/water. However, that side of the building gets pelting rain here in Oregon, and there are gaps and other flaws in that siding. So it has just become compromised.
    – JustMe53
    Sep 20 '17 at 21:52
  • I will look into PVC, thanks for that suggestion....
    – JustMe53
    Sep 20 '17 at 21:53

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