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I have a 10+ year old Dyson Vacuum cleaner. The top piece broke off. I'm looking for hints/pointers/do's/don'ts on how to repair the broken plastic.

Everything else works - it's only the plastic part that's broken.

I'm thinking Plastic Epoxy to bond the two parts and some sort of "Braces" on the two sides - with care to not affect the switch portion and any types of screws would need to be mindful of the wiring...

I just haven't seen anything that really addresses this type of repair in my searches. Plenty of hose repairs and day to day maintenance. The vacuum is top notch otherwise and I'd hate to have to replace it because of this..

enter image description here enter image description here

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    I'm voting to close this question because small appliance repair is expressly off-topic. – isherwood Jan 29 '19 at 20:56
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A "hobby shop" probably has the materials and glues for this. For bracing consider getting some stiff plastic, maybe 6" long and a half inch wide, and glue them on the inside so 3" are sticking out. You can then slip the other half on and glue it. I think JB Weld makes a plastic epoxy that could be put on the outside. Alternatively Google the name and model for a parts list. Once you have the part number you can go straight to the manufacturer or try eBay.

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  • I was going to say that bracing on the inside would be problematic, but I think that with a little bit of Dremel magic... that might actually be a good option. The second picture is blurry, but their is space to the outside of the grey block - which is the switch. – WernerCD Sep 5 '17 at 2:19
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There's a "new" product on the market, at least relatively new compared to all the other suggestions. It's called FiberFix and is effectively a fiberglass weave type tape with resin impregnated into the weave. The demo stuff show a broken shovel handle being repaired in a manner applicable to your broken handle. I believe the stuff ships in a sealed envelope, as it likely cures when exposed to air.

FiberFix tape

I bought some just in case I had a need for a repair for which this stuff is suitable, but luckily haven't had such a catastrophic break as in your photos.

enter image description here

The New Atlas article linked above is dated almost four years ago.

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  • I'll have to look into this... This plus brace... Only issue is wrapping over the break could cover the switch. But wrapping over a brace might look better than otter options. – WernerCD Sep 4 '17 at 17:54
  • I expect that you could cut a hole for the switch without reducing the strength too much. Considering that the stuff is probably pretty messy and sticky, it might be easier to build a wax layer over the switch, creating a bulge, apply the fiberglass tape, then after it cures, cut away at the bulge. The wax will prevent adhesion and make removing the desired material that much easier. – fred_dot_u Sep 4 '17 at 21:16
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I find plastic solvents like Weldon 4 work better for plastics the cements take a long time to cure and in my opinion weeken the plastic. On some acrylic work straight methline chloride works the best. Place the 2 pieces together then a few drops at the seams wait a few minutes and make sure the solvent enters the crack all the way around, depending on how tight the pieces fit together it may be usable in 10 minutes. If the pieces do not fit well cement may be needed but in some cases it takes a day or more to fully cure. Added weldon4 is an acrylic solvent , I have made many plastic projects with this and straight methline chloride.

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    Hmmm, makes me think of a recent discussion on acetone however a cement could still work depending on the type of plastic it is. I would try some acrylic cement on an inside portion with a similar type of ABS style plastic and see how it works. You can always cut/pry it out. I would do what everyone is suggesting, but put the stronger plastic "Popsicle sticks" on one half, on the inside, then when it cures, bond it to the other piece. It will still look good and distribute the force across the braces instead of the weld points. – noybman Sep 4 '17 at 2:04
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    I wouldn't mess with that acetone around this. Probably melt down into blob of bubbling goo. Innerwebs told me so...😂 – NPM Sep 4 '17 at 2:31
  • he WANTS to bond the plastic, which melting could allow. but most likely acetone would probably just discolor and smear/melt it without enough to make it bond. Dang innerwebs might be on to something. – noybman Sep 4 '17 at 19:26
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I think you're onto something with the bracing idea. You could Gorilla glue a paint stick to each side, then wrap the repair generously in Gorilla tape.

I assure you I do not work for Gorilla. I just really like the stuff. Half my life is held together with it's products... 😂

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I like everyone's ideas. Here's another.. While you will still glue it... Go into an open space and use a throw away tip on a solder iron to plastic melt-weld a few points (not the whole thing), Also.... You can drill a few holes and use some strapping wire, like 18 or 20 awg, and like a shoelace, lace it through some strategically placed holes. Then tighten almost like a turn-a-kit.

It wont be pretty, but it will hold. Also, it wouldn't interfere with wires and it can bend as needed to fit on the inside and outside. Then you can wrap it in some tubing, or heat shrink tape. (make it a little prettier. You can even buy blue.

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  • Some good ideas I hadn't considered (in addition to other answers). Holes and wire to pull stuff together mainly. – WernerCD Sep 4 '17 at 17:52

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