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I am looking to install several lutron caseta light switches in my home. The problem is the lutron switches are all rated 6amp but the existing switches and breakers in my home are 15amp.

Will be able to use these lutron switches? If not, don't most people have 15amp rated breakers in their homes? How does anyone use lutron caseta in this case?

Thanks!

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The switches are rated for the load they can carry ....it has nothing to do with your breaker rating.
On a fifteen amp circuit you could run multiple lights so long as the sum of all the lights currents (when on) does not exceed 15 A.

For example at maximum load, if you had to run a string of 150 W incandescent lights.

  1. You could run 12 of them on your 15 A circuit and not exceed the circuit breaker rating.
  2. However you could only control a maximum of 4 of the lights with each 6 A light switch.

There is lots wrong with the example above since incandescent lights draw a surge current ....but I ignored that for the example ...I hope you understand the objective.

So in your particular case, where you didn't specify the number or types of light fitting you are connecting ....you need to ensure that the total load current on each switch is under 6 A ....and that the sum of your multiple cicuits does not exceed the 15 A circuit rating.

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Your 15A breaker protects the wiring. All wiring downstream of that breaker must be capable of carrying 15A.

Your 6A switch can control a load of up to 6A. It is capable of opening and closing under a 6A load without damage, and carrying that load indefinitely.

Can the switch survive a surge for sufficiently long to take out a 15A breaker? The data sheet doesn't specify what fusing is required upstream. We can infer what surge the switch can handle from the data sheet from the incandescent/halogen lighting specification. These lights, when cold, have a resistance of about 10% of their running resistance, so draw a surge of 10x their running current. Although we note that this warmup surge tends not to take out a 15A breaker, otherwise the nuisance tripping would render them useless in lighting circuits.

In the absence of a specific fusing spec, you could be forgiven for assuming that it's OK 'with whatever is normally found in a house', like a 15A breaker. These switches will tend to use a TRIAC output, and these things are as tough as old boots. However, if your load is <6A, where's the harm in changing to a 6A breaker? You could also contact Lutron's technical department with a question.

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