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Here's a rough diagram of the apartment:

enter image description here

There's absolutely no air flow in the apartment, probably because of the directions (up = south)

The worst area of the apartment is the left section, as it contains heat-generating appliances (refrigerator, cold water bar, etc)

What would be the best way to ventilate the apartment? Will putting a fan on the window do the trick? What should be the direction of the fan - to insert fresh air from outside, or to exhaust hot air from the inside?

Usually all doors and windows are open except for the small window on the bottom-right side of the diagram.

closed as primarily opinion-based by mmathis, Tester101 Aug 28 '17 at 14:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I cover a lot of details regarding usage of fans in my answer. To get to your best results you will need to experiment. Start with one portable fan and see what works and what does not. We cannot really tell you what is going to work best because we have no idea as to what your outdoor climate is like, what type heating/cooling system may be in this apartment, or even what your tolerance level is to the heat and stagnant air. – Michael Karas Aug 16 '17 at 9:57
  • @MichaelKaras Thanks for your answer. I can tell you one thing: The two rooms on the left are far more hotter than the rightmost room. The outside temperature is usually more convenient than the temp. on the left room – Shai Aug 16 '17 at 10:07
  • If the outside temperature is comfortable and the air is decently clean then you may very well want to use a fan to bring air in. One possibility would be to bring outside air into the right room via the window and leave that room door in the hall open. Then put a second fan to blow out the hotter air from the left room window. Air from the hallway can flow into the left room to replace what the fan pushes out the window. Just establishing some air movement may make all the difference...like I said you need to experiment. – Michael Karas Aug 16 '17 at 10:13
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Fans move air. If you need to move air in this apartment then fans will be your friend. Putting fans in windows will be the most sure way to get air to flow in or out without it just circulating around inside.

There are downsides of using portable fans:

  1. Fans make noise.
  2. Fans in windows project some of the noise outside which may annoy neighbors.
  3. You will have to deal with cords strung over to an outlet to power the fan(s).
  4. Fans consume electrical power so will have some impact on your utility bill.
  5. Some types of fans may represent a safety hazard unless they are equipped with proper grills and screens to keep body parts away from spinning fan blades.
  6. Fans in windows may obscure views or light coming in.

Some advantages:

  1. Portable fans are for the most part are relatively cheap.
  2. You can position the fans experimentally to achieve the result you need.
  3. Moving air will feel cooler than stagnant air.
  4. There may be seasons where the fans are not needed and it is easy to store a portable fan away till needed again.
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    If you wish to move a lot of air, try placing a fan in a window facing outward. It feels cooler to have a fan blowing directly on you but to move more air, pull the air through the house. Consider a length of rope, is it easier to push or pull it? Your north window seems like it might be a place to point a fan out. It's away from the living area. If it's powerfull enough, it will pull air in all the south windows. You'll need to leave the bedroom door open. – JimmyJames Aug 16 '17 at 14:24

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