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I'm putting in some LED strips in my ceiling, but I'm really not sure how to play it.

The total length required is 20mtrs, running in a near perfect square. At the moment, I have one power outlet I can use.

I can't seem to find any 20mtr rolls; only rolls totalling 20mtrs (e.g. 4x5mtr), but as they all run from the same power source, it won't cover the 20mtrs required.

Am I best to maybe get another outlet on the opposite corner installed, and run 2x5mtr from each corner? I'm sure this is a dumb question, but could I run an extension through the roof to the opposite corner and do the same thing (in an attempt to save $)?

  • You mean lights like these: amazon.com/gp/product/B007TR52D2/… that come in 65' lengths ~20 meters? They also come in 100' lengths and can be cut to length every 18" I beleive. They come ready to plug in to 120 volts AC but may come in other voltages. Lower voltage versions come in shorter lengths since they use low voltage. Higher voltages have longer lengths. – ArchonOSX Aug 14 '17 at 8:46
  • That would be perfect, but I forgot to mention...I'm in Australia...😔 Unfortunately the folk at amazon haven't set up shop here yet, and don't (or rarely) ship here... – Julesyyyyy Aug 14 '17 at 9:29
  • @ArchonOSX questions about "LED strips" are ambiguous, but "5 metre" and concerns about current limits are both very strong flags for the 12V variety (or rather varietIES as there are so many.) – Harper Aug 14 '17 at 16:18
  • NO AMAZON!!! Wow that sux. Well, I am pretty sure that stuff is made in China so you should be able to locate it somewhere there. Just look for the higher voltage ones and they will be AC ready and come in longer lengths. – ArchonOSX Aug 14 '17 at 21:06
  • Yeh no amazon isn't cool at all...! See, all the cheap Chinese ones are designed really oddly. I should have linked this to begin with, as it makes more sense as to why it won't work. – Julesyyyyy Aug 15 '17 at 12:11
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Not sure the level of problem you are taking on here. Most "bare" LED strips you can pick up these days are DC based, and you need to add a AC to DC power supply that provides the voltage (12 or 24v) and current required by your strips. First you need to find those requirements and pick a supply.

Next, you can daisy chain these strips together, soldering low voltage wires from one to the next, to get all the way around your room, though I wouldn't recommend that. The problem is that the copper in the strips is not very thick, and there will be a voltage drop over the length of the strip, so the end LEDs will be dimmer than the first.

A better plan would be to feed them from the center out. A even better plan is to run a separate set of wires from the power supply to each strip. The number of wires will vary depending on if the strips are single color, multi, or RGB.

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Without knowing the LED lights in question...

  1. Your average LED lights take very little power to run. It's not unreasonable to assume that a 20M strip could be run off a single outlet. I've string LED Christmas lights about that length before, and used only one outlet (daisy chained to boot) but they're also not meant to be crazy bright either.
  2. If you need another outlet, don't cheat with an extension cord. If one outlet will not suffice, an extension cord won't fix that (in fact it could be more dangerous). You need to make sure you're not putting the whole circuit over budget on amps, or the breaker will trip. This may require adding a new circuit entirely.
  • These are almost assuredly 12V lights. They are typically 24 watts per 5 metre section. Yes, that is a lot of light. – Harper Aug 14 '17 at 3:00
  • Don't get me wrong, I'm not concerned with drawing too much power. I just didn't want to daisy chain because of the loss of brightness, and the only 20mtr strips I can find that deliver to my location, at a decent price, are like this (see link), and they wouldn't work in the room. – Julesyyyyy Aug 15 '17 at 21:59
  • [link] (lightinthebox.com/…) – Julesyyyyy Aug 15 '17 at 21:59

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