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I have never seen a faucet leak like this. The supply lines are fine. The water moves to the center where it mixes the hot and cold water, then drips from where the drain plug pull emerges. Is there an o-ring in there that the drain pull passes through?

The water is definitely coming from where the drain pull comes out of the center union.

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  • I cannot imagine any reasonable designer would design a system where the drain plug pull would pass through the water flow piping, even the non-pressurized piping, i.e., the post valves mixing chamber. – Jim Stewart Jun 19 '17 at 15:47
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It would appear to be a Pfister Marielle LF49 without the base escutcheon:
Here Exploded parts diagram

Pfister has great customer support, and a lifetime warranty on their products, so I would recommend that you phone them and describe the issue. 1-800-pfaucet

  • Pfister only offered to allow me to purchase the entire center unit for around $140. It is not repairable. – Evil Elf Jul 30 '17 at 14:18
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I cannot imagine any reasonable designer would design a system where the drain plug pull would pass through the water flow piping, even the non-pressurized piping, i.e., the post valves mixing chamber. In my bathroom faucet with a lever-operated pop-up drain the actuating rod is behind the spigot.

But it appears that for this faucet the pull is coaxial with the riser of the mixing chamber! The water must flow in an annular space around a central open space that the pull passes through. Somehow water is getting into this central open space.

You would have to look at the diagram for this faucet to determine whether there are replaceable seals (such as O-rings, bushings, or other elastomer elements) which seal the mixing chamber on the bottom or the top. It may be a failure in a non-repairable press fit.

I would first try snugging up the nut on the bottom which clamps the plastic fitting onto the faucet. But do not overdo it. If this does not work you may have to disassemble the mixing chamber.

In that case, I would remove the actuation rod, loosen and remove the nut, and pull off the white plastic fitting and see if there is a replaceable seal on the bottom. There may be another on the top.

My first thought is that the actuation rod itself would NOT be sealed with O-rings, but there may be some short-cut designs currently sold which do things this way.

  • Annular mixing union is the same thing I thought of first. – Evil Elf Jun 19 '17 at 16:12

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