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I have a gravel driveway uphill. I put new 1/2" rock gravel in last fall because of washout. I also spread concrete and sprayed it, but it didn't take. I have a 05 Harley Davidson Road King custom that I can't get up or down the driveway without almost dumping it.

Can I put anything on it to harden it up enough to get my bike up and down? It's too long to cement or asphalt it.

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    Unfortunately, it may be difficult to fix now. It would have been better to have used a self-binding gravel. These gravels contain a range of particle size from fines, through sand to gravel. Local quarries are likely to produce some form of gravel with fines. It might be possible to top dress with smaller aggregates and sand to approximate a self-binding gravel in situ. Results may vary (hence a comment rather than an answer) and it is would be worth experimenting with a small area first. – George of all trades Apr 14 '17 at 7:39
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What shape is the gravel? Go look at railroad ballast, you want that stuff, aka "crushed stone", very jaggy and will interlock when tamped down. Very hard to shovel for that reason. You want a smaller size though.

Any sort of round or half-round pea gravel type stuff has to go. Get a loader, shovel it outta there, save it for aggregate for concrete.

The difference is night and day.

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You could use a plate compactor and attempt to compact the gravel into the soil to provide a firm base. Take a look at this similar post for good suggestions.

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Here around Pittsburgh, Pa. we have a combination gravel called "modified". It has several sizes of lime or slag chips and a lot of what is called "fines". You spread it out, tamp it down with a compactor and after a short time it compacts to a very hard surface. You can still dig it up with aggressive tire action, but it is better than the stuff you used. George of all trades has a similar recommendation

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I had the same promblem with my driveway a couple years ago and i got estimates on getting it both asphalt and concrete and both were really expensive but the asphalt guy mentioned a tar and chip driveway was what i needed for traction and for the price i could afford which was a fraction of the price of asphalt and the best part was it didnt require regular maintenance like seal coating or cracking like asphalt or concrete and it also brought a very decorative look to my driveway. Maybe you should check for tar and chip pavers and ill post a link to what im referring to.https://youtu.be/IgYnrFt3TqM

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