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I have a Chamberlain model 1345 that is 11 or 12 years old. It stopped closing with the clicker recently, but I can still open/close using the wall button. Chamberlain support said I need a new board for the receiver (around $70). I hate to spend that on an old model because something else might go bad soon and I might need to replace the whole thing anyway. But I also hate to toss out a perfectly good unit (except for the closing with the clicker issues). Why can't I buy a generic remote like the kind people use to turn on a lamp wirelessly? I would replace the wall button with the receiver for the generic remote, and then the clickers for the generic remote would "push" the wall button. Has anyone ever done this? Thanks in advance for any advice.

  • I recommend you just bite the bullet and replace the board. You probably have many years of service remaining in this opener. The openers usually come with two remotes. How many remote openers do you have? Do you have a remote keypad on the outside? – Jim Stewart Mar 8 '17 at 17:50
  • Did Chamberlain support have you try some simple possibilities like unplugging the opener for a minute and then restoring power? Probably won't restore function, but it costs nothing to try. Sometimes this "reboots" electronics. Then wiggle the connector to the receiver board, or even disconnect and reconnect (with power off). – Jim Stewart Mar 8 '17 at 18:03
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    Possibly could DIY replacement of the board: gatehousesupplies.com/… – Jim Stewart Mar 8 '17 at 18:32
  • Do you have more than one remote, and did they both stop working at the same time? Any other wireless controls, like a keypad? If there's only one remote it could just be the remote (and I am assuming you tried changing the battery). – gregmac Mar 8 '17 at 19:44
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    @Trevor Modern garage door openers using a rolling code, so you can't clone them (immune to replay attacks), which is very similar to the way RSA/two-factor tokens or credit card contactless payments work. Aside from cloning, there is also an attack that can brute force attack a fixed code opener in 8 seconds. This is another good reason to replace with a newer model, if you have a fixed-code opener. – gregmac Mar 8 '17 at 21:34
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The simplest way to fix this problem is to purchase a "universal garage door receiver" or "universal radio control replacement" which does as the asker proposes. It is a receiver box that wires into your door pushbutton circuit and pairs to a new remote.

It is also useful for modernizing fixed-code openers for security. However, I understand that the industry safety standard is that no opener without a optical beam may be retrofit or repaired; those must be replaced completely.

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Unfortunately, I don't know a lot about that model opener, but depending on the real problem, you can buy replacement remotes and receivers from other vendors. I replaced the receivers on my doors a few years back with a modern rolling code unit, and that was compatible with the remotes built into my wife's Honda Accord. But my opener was designed with the receiver as a separate component that attached to the drive via a three screw terminal interface. There are are variety of vendors and dealers that are willing to sell you components, provided you know what you are looking for. Google is your friend.

Here is someone on ebay http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/132015114169 selling the remote for $17. Now if the receiver is the problem, this doesn't help. Shop around. You may find the receiver for less. It also pays to get a spare remote.

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