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I would like to turn off this pilot light on my 1930's Wedgewood stove, to use less gas. I can't see any obvious way to turn it off; am I missing something? Like I don't know if that nut or what seems to be an airflow controller below it would do anything. Figured I'd ask before trying it, before moving the stove out to look for other valves.

Wedgewood stove pilot light

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    Follow the gas pipe and thermocouple back to the gas valve and post a picture of that. – Tyson Feb 24 '17 at 4:41
  • How would you use the stove if the pilot is not on. Would you turn on a gas jet and then light it manually? The stove might have controls that prevent that. The rod shaped element on the left of the pilot flame is a sensor that has to be hot to keep the gas on. – Jim Stewart Feb 24 '17 at 13:27
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    Pilot lights use exceptionally little gas. Turning it off would only matter if you didn't use the stove for long periods of time, in which case you should follow a shutdown procedure (involving extinguishing the pilot anyway). If your goal is to save gas, you won't gain much here... – Hari Ganti Feb 25 '17 at 0:05
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No, there is no valve visible here. On this particular model, after further searching, the valve for the broiler pilot turned out to be where the pilot gas line exits the gas distribution manifold, which is under the cooktop, by the broiler control dial. It looks like a a flathead screw. If you're going to then use it by lighting with a match/striker/lighter, then obviously only do this with a broiler or something else that is simple on-off, not something like an oven that has a thermostat.

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    If this stove is in a vacation home so that it has long periods where it is not used, then turn off the gas supply at the wall tap when the house is unoccupied. When the house is reoccupied, turn on the wall tap and go through the procedure for lighting the pilot. If this house is continuously occupied, keep the pilot on and accept this gas use as unavoidable. Does this pilot also supply ignition for the oven and broiler? I can remember from my childhood that lighting the oven/broiler with a match was often accompanied by an attention-getting whoosh. Who needs that? – Jim Stewart Feb 24 '17 at 22:20
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Almost certainly the pilot light has to be on for the stove to supply gas to a burner. This stove was designed in a time when the gas consumption of the pilot was thought to be negligible. In the winter time the pilot in an unvented kitchen stove just adds to be space heating of the house, but in the summer it unfortunately adds to the heat load.

I can remember (late 1940s or early 1950s) gas kitchen stoves being lit with a match so some can be operated that way, but unless you know this one was designed to be operated that way you are risking a gas explosion or gas poisoning. I would NOT use trial and error to see if your Wedgewood stove can operate without the pilot on.

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  • Edited answer to add a NOT which I left out. – Jim Stewart Feb 24 '17 at 15:36
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    This does not answer the question. – joseph_morris Feb 24 '17 at 17:58

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