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Last July, we had a company come out and blow insulation into the cavities of the exterior walls...

We've seen the issue for a while, but have been ignoring it, but now I am working on one of the rooms and would like to remedy it.

Basically, house was built in 1974. Drywall was secured (properly) around exterior edges, and only glued throughout the center studs. Naturally, that glue bond has deteriorated, so when the insulation was blown in, the drywall bowed. In some cases not so much, but on longer spans, I would estimate up to 2-3 inches.

Is there anyway to resolve this without tearing out the drywall completely?

I have tried a 2x4 down the length of a few studs, secured in with 4" decking screws, but the boad ultimately just bends and follows the contour of the wall.

  • "I have tried a 2x4 down the length of a few studs, secured in with 4" decking screws, but the boad ultimately just bends and follows the contour of the wall." Sounds like the insulation has worked its way into the space between the drywall and the stud. – Alaska Man Feb 14 '17 at 5:21
  • If your suspicion holds true, the drywall will have to come off. – tahwos Feb 16 '17 at 2:19
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Did they blow in dry fiber glass, cellulose, or wet foam. Years ago my brother- in- law got into the foam insulation business and foamed some houses. The wet foam loosened the glue and the drywall bowed. His insurance paid to have the drywall replaced on every wall effected. After that event he would never take another insulation job where that same builder built the house since they used glue and only a few screws to hold the dry wall in place. My guess would be that the insulation contractor is " on the hook" for the bowed walls. I would call him and show him the problem. Let him decide what to do.

  • Yeah, it was foam. Unfortunately, it was a large company that made me sign waivers. I don't recall off the top of my head if that was specifically mentioned. I have a feeling I'm just going to end up ripping the sheet rock down, cutting out the "extra" insulation, and putting up new sheet rock. Kinda defeats a lot of the purpose of blown-in insulation :/ – Calvin Allen Feb 16 '17 at 21:12

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