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I have this situation where the driveway in front of my house was made from stone dust, the problem is the dust from the driveway was carried by the wind and goes to my house and cover everything in dust. I am wondering is there any way to reduce the amount of dust carried away by the wind?

migrated from engineering.stackexchange.com Dec 26 '16 at 16:00

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  • How long has it been in place? My impression was that stone dust hardens with a little water and compaction. After that it shouldn't create more dust. – hazzey Dec 25 '16 at 19:23
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    The usual method is to spray your used oil on it, but for some reason, the environmentalists get all upset when you do this. :-( So most people have switched to paving with asphalt, which is just a thicker grade of waste oil. – Dave Tweed Dec 25 '16 at 19:33
  • @hazzey it has been there for almost a month now. Does a little water will still help? – shafiyyah Dec 26 '16 at 3:24
  • Water helps, but it is a temporary solution. When the water evaporates & the pathway dries the problem will re-occur. You either have to keep it permanently wet, cover it with an oil based product, or resurface or replace it with something else – Fred Dec 26 '16 at 7:52
  • gorilla snot by soilworks or calcium chloride sprayed on for dust control – spicetraders Dec 26 '16 at 16:15
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A very common dust control agent for road is Calcium Chloride it uses hygroscopic properties that allows it to retain water molecules. It hydrates and forms a "liquid layer" that helps dust particles to stick and hold, this on the a road suppresses formation of dust.
The dirt roads in front of our home and surrounding streets are sprayed annually by the county maintenance to form a hard dust free road.

As and alternative a coating like Soilworks Gorilla Snot which is a biodegradable liquid copolymer that is sprayed on for erosion and dust control.
For the last 8 years the near by Marine Air Station has applied it for dust and erosion control on the training range.
As of this last summer it was started being used by the state highway department on desert areas near Tuscon/Phoenix to keep dust storms from causing traffic wrecks on the near by freeway.

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