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I have the typical Sump Pump setup with a 1HP pump and what seems to be drainage tile leading into the basin. Works fine 99% of the time but in a very big and long storm the pump isn't enough and the basin overflows into the basement. What I don't understand is why this kind of setup has to be an "open system", meaning it may overflows. Why can't we have a "closed shut" system, like in an ejector pump? So in case of excess pressure, the water would be just pushed along the pipes to outside the house instead of flooding my basement? Ideas? Thanks

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You'd stop the flow for a while, then it would come up through all the joints and cracks and gaps in the system. (A home's foundation and floor are not really like a swimming pool. They're not intended to be water-tight. Very little pressure would be present.)

What you'd be left with is essentially a home without a drainage system, subject to all the flooding and related unpleasantness of centuries past.

  • Thanks for the answers. Let me clarify. I dont want to eliminate the sump pump, I just dont understand why the basin/pit has to be open. Why cant it be like an ejector pum? I.e. Water goes into a sealed container and then gets pumped out through another end. If the pump stops working or if the input pressure is bigger than the pump can handle, the water would still go out through the output pipe pushed by the water pressure itself... In no instance it would leak into the environment like a sump does. Thoughts? Thanks – Daniel Moura Dec 4 '16 at 22:13
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Hydrostatic pressure can do serious damage. The basement floor would likely buckle first, before it raised (floated) your entire house.

Depending on how often this happens you should either get a pump with a higher GPH flow rate, or add a second auxiliary pump.

Related: Check these swimming pools that floated out of the ground as a result of hydrostatic pressure.

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  • Thanks for the answers. Let me clarify. I dont want to eliminate the sump pump, I just dont understand why the basin/pit has to be open. Why cant it be like an ejector pum? I.e. Water goes into a sealed container and then gets pumped out through another end. If the pump stops working or if the input pressure is bigger than the pump can handle, the water would still go out through the output pipe pushed by the water pressure itself... In no instance it would leak into the environment like a sump does. Thoughts? Thanks – Daniel Moura Dec 4 '16 at 22:13
  • The amount of water headed to an ejector pump is relatively finite. The amount of water in significant storm is relatively infinite. To alleviate your problem you must either add a secondary pump in the same pit, or increase the capacity of the primary pump or both. If it were possible to seal up the basement tight as a swimming pool is constructed then the ground water would literally lift the house and foundation. Basements aren't that tight tho and you need to pump the water faster to alleviate the backup. You might also be able to change outdoor drainage to keep water away as well. – Tyson Dec 5 '16 at 0:03

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