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i am hanging a ceiling lamp which came with an cord set only rated 60W -- insufficient for my purposes. poking around in my parts bins, i found a rubberized E26 socket rated something like 660W, but labeled "FOR TEMPORARY USE ONLY". what does this rule mean, and can i use the socket anyway?

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  • It's frequently the rest of the lamp that can't take the heat, not the cord. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 12 '16 at 4:24
  • I have flagged this to be migrated to DIY.se, the home improvement stack exchange. – cde Nov 12 '16 at 4:25
  • @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams agreed, but I assert that it is not the case with this lamp. i won't install anything underrated, of course. – Aaron Brick Nov 12 '16 at 5:27
  • This is common on temporary outdoor lighting strings and their replacement sockets. It's a reminder to the user that they are not designed or approved for permanent outdoor installation. – Jimmy Fix-it Nov 12 '16 at 12:48
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It likely means that it is NOT designed or constructed for CONTINUOUS use and/or to be built INTO some kind of fixture. It can handle the heat dissipation only when out in the free air, and with intermittent use. Perhaps no more than 2 or 4 hours at a stretch, etc.

  • i have seen the label "not for continuous use" plenty of times on machines with moving parts, but never on electrical parts; you think this is a synonym? – Aaron Brick Nov 12 '16 at 6:44

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