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I have a 100 ft run to make. I was going to cut a hole in the existing concrete , lay the cable and pour concrete over top. I am just having troubles figuring out what my different options are for cables. So far I know,

  1. Teck cable ( I feel it is going to be the most expensive)

Can you please answer me if

  1. I am able to run electrical conduit or regular white walled conduit with some single strands inside?

  2. If I am able to run conduit with BX or Loomex inside?

  3. If I am able to run NMDU ( the loomed with the black outside, weather rated).

It seems to be the embedding in concrete and filling in with concrete that is tripping me up. As well as if you can feed cables like loomex through conduits. I always thought you were only aloud to for a very short run but can not find the code rule saying that.

Thanks everybody.

  • Where on this planet are you? – ThreePhaseEel Nov 12 '16 at 5:57
  • The west coast of Canada. – JollyGoodTime Nov 12 '16 at 15:54
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I have not seen cable of any sort in direct contact with concrete. It has always been placed in conduit, in the gravel bed. At the least it has been UF in the gravel bed, but never low voltage in direct bury.

In my opinion, you would be wise to place 2 conduits under the level of the concrete. This with keep the concrete from cracking over the pipe, it acts as a control joint, but on the underside if into the concrete. The 2 conduit need to be separated at least by 6" more if possible. This will keep the low voltage from picking up on the interference created by the line voltage.

Your length of run, should be good, in the States there is a maximum run of 200 ft between pull boxes (Maybe it is 100'), one of the electrical guys can firm this I hope. Never the less, you are ok on this.

If you are using direct bury cable, after you get out from the edge of the concrete, I would get it down 18" if possible, or keep it in the conduit to protect it from casual digging.

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