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I'm building a small floating wall about 3.5' wide. almost 8' tall. It will be 'floating' 8" away from the ceiling, floor, and perpendicular wall via 1/4" steel pipe connected to floor flanges. It will look like this:

-------------------------------
      ---            ---    | |
       |              | <---|-|--- 1/4" steel pipe + 
     --------------------   | |    floor flanges
     |                  |   | |
     |                  |--|| |
     |                  |   | |
     |                  |   | |
     |    'Floating'    |   | |<-- perpendicular wall
     |       wall       |   | |
     |                  |   | |
     |                  |   | |
     |                  |   | |
     |                  |--|| |
     |                  |   | |
     --------------------   | |
       |              |     | |
      ---            ---    | |
-------------------------------

I can easily screw into the ceiling and perpendicular wall. But I'd like to avoid drilling into the floor as future owners may want to remove this and patching holes in floors is a pain (as opposed to holes in sheetrock).

I was initially going to use rubber pads under the ones on the bottom and hoping there'd be enough tension to cause it to grip solid.

But given this is an entry way wall, I can see someone large grabbing the edge of the wall to put on their shoes or something and worry about that lower outer leg pushing out.

Is there any sort of adhesive I could use that would give the bottom plates more rigidity...but easily be removable in the future?

I'm thinking some industrial size version of those 3M 'snot' adhesives they use on hooks where they are very adhesive, but can be pulled off in the future. (Come to think of it, maybe 3M does make large versions of those already?)

3

Pure silicone will provide very good shear bonding, yet you'll be able to peel it up later from non-porous surfaces.

  • Even normal construction adhesive can be removed with enough muscle... the older it is, the easier. – User95050 Oct 25 '16 at 17:13
  • 1
    Yeah, no. You're likely to pull wood apart or leave rough residue with construction glue. – isherwood Oct 25 '16 at 17:24
  • Perfect! Here's the catch...I'm not sure how non-porous these floors are. They're cheap pergo. They seem to be holding up well for being pergo, and do seem to pool water (not soak in) so maybe they'll be OK? – DA01 Oct 25 '16 at 17:30
  • Most laminate floors should do fine. They're sealed for the most part. Deeply-grained surfaces may require a little buffing. – isherwood Oct 25 '16 at 17:34
  • Sorry, missed the part about it being a finished floor. Ignore my comment. – User95050 Oct 25 '16 at 19:11

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