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We're thinking of building a roof terrace on the flat roof at the rear of a property. The property is in the UK and is not in a conservation area.

Do we need to seek planning permission to do this? If so, how likely is it to be difficult and is there anything we can do to smooth the way?

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    The only way to know for sure, is to contact your local government. Codes, laws, and ordinances vary from location to location. – Tester101 Nov 9 '11 at 15:05
  • Agreed - you HAVE to go to your council and ask them. Each region has its own constraints, building regulations and styles of builds- on top of that there could be other reasons to might prevent you from doing this- So to make things smoother- go to the council and local surveyor and ask them. – Piotr Kula Nov 9 '11 at 15:27
  • Bummer. Does one of you want to put that info in an answer so I can resolve the question? – Tom Wright Nov 9 '11 at 16:13
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It is best to ask your local council or pop into a local surveyor and pay a few bob for reliable advise about this. You will have to have some plan for it and how you want it to look I suppose.

If its a simple conversion (and your roof can support it - that is what the council will be mostly interested in) it is most likely there would not be any problem with planning permission (and might not need any)

simple roof terrace with best chance

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But like I commented your region, suburb might have estical constraints and dis-allow any external changes, eg solar panels, window colours, etc ,etc.

A design obscuring might be problematic.

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You will need to seek planning permission for roof terrace. The main reason is that it can overlook the neighbours on either side. If you had solid walls on either side and you wanted to go straight back that is likely to be ok.

Still as always best to check with you local authority to confirm.

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The only way to know for sure, is to contact your local government. Codes, laws, and ordinances vary from location to location.

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