Question Protected by Community
4 added 587 characters in body
source | link

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

Followup: We ended up getting film on a few windows just to see how it would go. On one glass door, we added a film the the minimum reflectivity and it does cut down the heat significantly without changing the night time view too much.

On our upstairs bedroom windows, we added privacy film. During daytime, these windows look like mirrors from the outside but remain clear(ish) from the inside. They add a strong blue tinge to the inside light. Once you hit twilight, the situation reverses and you get no view outside at all. The film also shows a subtle, oily sort of pattern all over it. We thought this would go away over time - it has not.

We had the film professionally installed. Even for a pro, it was a full day job. The cost was very reasonable, especially compared to the cost of the curtains.

Follow-up to the follow-up: We have external awnings added to our house on some of the windows that did not have film. The awnings are pretty thick but you can still see through them. We have found the awnings to do a much better job that the film. We have just been through a summer with quite a few low 40s days (C). We have two windows on the same wall, 2 metres apart. The door with the film still lets through a lot of heat whereas the window with the awning blocks most of the heat and still lets though enough light that we don't need to turn the lights on during the day.

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

Followup: We ended up getting film on a few windows just to see how it would go. On one glass door, we added a film the the minimum reflectivity and it does cut down the heat significantly without changing the night time view too much.

On our upstairs bedroom windows, we added privacy film. During daytime, these windows look like mirrors from the outside but remain clear(ish) from the inside. They add a strong blue tinge to the inside light. Once you hit twilight, the situation reverses and you get no view outside at all. The film also shows a subtle, oily sort of pattern all over it. We thought this would go away over time - it has not.

We had the film professionally installed. Even for a pro, it was a full day job. The cost was very reasonable, especially compared to the cost of the curtains.

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

Followup: We ended up getting film on a few windows just to see how it would go. On one glass door, we added a film the the minimum reflectivity and it does cut down the heat significantly without changing the night time view too much.

On our upstairs bedroom windows, we added privacy film. During daytime, these windows look like mirrors from the outside but remain clear(ish) from the inside. They add a strong blue tinge to the inside light. Once you hit twilight, the situation reverses and you get no view outside at all. The film also shows a subtle, oily sort of pattern all over it. We thought this would go away over time - it has not.

We had the film professionally installed. Even for a pro, it was a full day job. The cost was very reasonable, especially compared to the cost of the curtains.

Follow-up to the follow-up: We have external awnings added to our house on some of the windows that did not have film. The awnings are pretty thick but you can still see through them. We have found the awnings to do a much better job that the film. We have just been through a summer with quite a few low 40s days (C). We have two windows on the same wall, 2 metres apart. The door with the film still lets through a lot of heat whereas the window with the awning blocks most of the heat and still lets though enough light that we don't need to turn the lights on during the day.

3 added 816 characters in body
source | link

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

Followup: We ended up getting film on a few windows just to see how it would go. On one glass door, we added a film the the minimum reflectivity and it does cut down the heat significantly without changing the night time view too much.

On our upstairs bedroom windows, we added privacy film. During daytime, these windows look like mirrors from the outside but remain clear(ish) from the inside. They add a strong blue tinge to the inside light. Once you hit twilight, the situation reverses and you get no view outside at all. The film also shows a subtle, oily sort of pattern all over it. We thought this would go away over time - it has not.

We had the film professionally installed. Even for a pro, it was a full day job. The cost was very reasonable, especially compared to the cost of the curtains.

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

I have just finished renovating my house and am now considering adding UV film to some of my windows (those that catch the most sun). On paper, they sound like a great solution as they reduce the heat entering the house and furniture fading but I have not had any experience with them. I would hate to see my house looking like those crappy cars with the window tint full of bubbles.

Does anyone have any practical experience with window tinting? Are they good? What issues do I need to be aware of?

I live in Melbourne (Aus) so summers hit 40 degrees but winters rarely drop below 5 degrees.

Followup: We ended up getting film on a few windows just to see how it would go. On one glass door, we added a film the the minimum reflectivity and it does cut down the heat significantly without changing the night time view too much.

On our upstairs bedroom windows, we added privacy film. During daytime, these windows look like mirrors from the outside but remain clear(ish) from the inside. They add a strong blue tinge to the inside light. Once you hit twilight, the situation reverses and you get no view outside at all. The film also shows a subtle, oily sort of pattern all over it. We thought this would go away over time - it has not.

We had the film professionally installed. Even for a pro, it was a full day job. The cost was very reasonable, especially compared to the cost of the curtains.

2 Title as question
| link

Pros What are the pros and cons of UV window film?

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackDIY/status/133549088665894912
1
source | link