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HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for sharper techs. 

There is no justifying whether a system is running properly based on just an overcoil measurement. It depends greatly on the enthalpic heat in the conditioned space. Today my split might need to be 20 tomorrow it might need to be ten. 28 degrees seems high to me. Sounds like an airflow issue or lack of refrigerant. Is the filter clean? 

To the tech that never takes an evaporator split we are in a new era of technology. Our old beercan cold ways are a dinosaur. I suggest you embrace a program that will put you back on top of your game ask. Ask your equipment manufacturer for classes about prescribed charging methods etc. With variable speed technology moving in and adjustable CFM on the board you will have to know how airflow effects Delta T. You cannot properly test super-Heat (Non TxV systems) for charge without the return air wet bulb measurement. In order to determine proper super heat you would need to compare to a psychrometric chart. look at the service facts.

HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for sharper techs. There is no justifying whether a system is running properly based on just an overcoil measurement. It depends greatly on the enthalpic heat in the conditioned space. Today my split might need to be 20 tomorrow it might need to be ten. 28 degrees seems high to me. Sounds like an airflow issue or lack of refrigerant. Is the filter clean? To the tech that never takes an evaporator split we are in a new era of technology. Our old beercan cold ways are a dinosaur I suggest you embrace a program that will put you back on top of your game ask your equipment manufacturer for classes about prescribed charging methods etc. With variable speed technology moving in and adjustable CFM on the board you will have to know how airflow effects Delta T. You cannot properly test super-Heat (Non TxV systems) for charge without the return air wet bulb measurement. In order to determine proper super heat you would need to compare to a psychrometric chart. look at the service facts.

HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for sharper techs. 

There is no justifying whether a system is running properly based on just an overcoil measurement. It depends greatly on the enthalpic heat in the conditioned space. Today my split might need to be 20 tomorrow it might need to be ten. 28 degrees seems high to me. Sounds like an airflow issue or lack of refrigerant. Is the filter clean? 

To the tech that never takes an evaporator split we are in a new era of technology. Our old beercan cold ways are a dinosaur. I suggest you embrace a program that will put you back on top of your game. Ask your equipment manufacturer for classes about prescribed charging methods etc. With variable speed technology moving in and adjustable CFM on the board you will have to know how airflow effects Delta T. You cannot properly test super-Heat (Non TxV systems) for charge without the return air wet bulb measurement. In order to determine proper super heat you would need to compare to a psychrometric chart. look at the service facts.

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HVAC Technicians must understand how to take proper measurements for Delta T and ambient temperatures along with the Wet Bulb temperatures. With a little math You really do not have a reason to crack into the refrigerant system. The industry in my area as a whole is quite vocal about moving away from the gauge on every PM approach. It is just time for sharper techs. There is no justifying whether a system is running properly based on just an overcoil measurement. It depends greatly on the enthalpic heat in the conditioned space. Today my split might need to be 20 tomorrow it might need to be ten. 28 degrees seems high to me. Sounds like an airflow issue or lack of refrigerant. Is the filter clean? To the tech that never takes an evaporator split we are in a new era of technology. Our old beercan cold ways are a dinosaur I suggest you embrace a program that will put you back on top of your game ask your equipment manufacturer for classes about prescribed charging methods etc. With variable speed technology moving in and adjustable CFM on the board you will have to know how airflow effects Delta T. You cannot properly test super-Heat (Non TxV systems) for charge without the return air wet bulb measurement. In order to determine proper super heat you would need to compare to a psychrometric chart. look at the service facts.