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Note that you don't need to cut crown moulding flat, you can just place it upside down with the top on the base of the miter saw and the wall side against the back of the saw.

As ChrisF mentions, your walls won't be a perfect 90°. For inside corners, the mud from the drywall install will push the corner out, which will result in the back corners of the moulding touching before the visible ones. Therefore, I typically cut closer to 43° or so for an inside corner. For outside corners, I'll reverse that to 47° or so.

And as others say, coping an inside corner has the best look if you're good at coping. And when joining pieces in the middle of a long wall, make sure the 45° you cut points into the wall instead of into the room where any gap will be visible. (Same rule goes for installing vinyl siding, make sure the pieces overlap so you aren't looking into any gaps from the front of the home.)

Note that you don't cut crown moulding flat, you just place it upside down with the top on the base of the miter saw and the wall side against the back of the saw.

As ChrisF mentions, your walls won't be a perfect 90°. For inside corners, the mud from the drywall install will push the corner out, which will result in the back corners of the moulding touching before the visible ones. Therefore, I typically cut closer to 43° or so for an inside corner. For outside corners, I'll reverse that to 47° or so.

Note that you don't need to cut crown moulding flat, you can just place it upside down with the top on the base of the miter saw and the wall side against the back of the saw.

As ChrisF mentions, your walls won't be a perfect 90°. For inside corners, the mud from the drywall install will push the corner out, which will result in the back corners of the moulding touching before the visible ones. Therefore, I typically cut closer to 43° or so for an inside corner. For outside corners, I'll reverse that to 47° or so.

And as others say, coping an inside corner has the best look if you're good at coping. And when joining pieces in the middle of a long wall, make sure the 45° you cut points into the wall instead of into the room where any gap will be visible. (Same rule goes for installing vinyl siding, make sure the pieces overlap so you aren't looking into any gaps from the front of the home.)

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source | link

Note that you don't cut crown moulding flat, you just place it upside down with the top on the base of the miter saw and the wall side against the back of the saw.

As ChrisF mentions, your walls won't be a perfect 90°. For inside corners, the mud from the drywall install will push the corner out, which will result in the back corners of the moulding touching before the visible ones. Therefore, I typically cut closer to 43° or so for an inside corner. For outside corners, I'll reverse that to 47° or so.