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We recently had an asbestos abatement crew remove heating ducts in our house that had asbestos-lined duct insulation. Part of the process required them to remove the duct registers in the wall as well.

The result is that I have sections like this in almost every room in the house:

alt text

Yikes. What's the procedure for repairing drywall like this?

I was thinking of doing something similar to Niall's recommendation herehere. Basically cut back some extra drywall on the sides so there's room on all of the studs (which would also have the benefit of removing the damaged sides... then put in a cross support between the studs and screw the drywall to all sides and the cross support. Then mud/tape as usual.

Is there a better way to do this? Keep in mind that I'm a beginner and need to do this procedure multiple times.

I should also mention that we're not planning to add the registers back at this time... it'll be several years before we get a new furnace anyway. We just want to repair the drywall and make it look like the hole was never there.

-M

We recently had an asbestos abatement crew remove heating ducts in our house that had asbestos-lined duct insulation. Part of the process required them to remove the duct registers in the wall as well.

The result is that I have sections like this in almost every room in the house:

alt text

Yikes. What's the procedure for repairing drywall like this?

I was thinking of doing something similar to Niall's recommendation here. Basically cut back some extra drywall on the sides so there's room on all of the studs (which would also have the benefit of removing the damaged sides... then put in a cross support between the studs and screw the drywall to all sides and the cross support. Then mud/tape as usual.

Is there a better way to do this? Keep in mind that I'm a beginner and need to do this procedure multiple times.

I should also mention that we're not planning to add the registers back at this time... it'll be several years before we get a new furnace anyway. We just want to repair the drywall and make it look like the hole was never there.

-M

We recently had an asbestos abatement crew remove heating ducts in our house that had asbestos-lined duct insulation. Part of the process required them to remove the duct registers in the wall as well.

The result is that I have sections like this in almost every room in the house:

alt text

Yikes. What's the procedure for repairing drywall like this?

I was thinking of doing something similar to Niall's recommendation here. Basically cut back some extra drywall on the sides so there's room on all of the studs (which would also have the benefit of removing the damaged sides... then put in a cross support between the studs and screw the drywall to all sides and the cross support. Then mud/tape as usual.

Is there a better way to do this? Keep in mind that I'm a beginner and need to do this procedure multiple times.

I should also mention that we're not planning to add the registers back at this time... it'll be several years before we get a new furnace anyway. We just want to repair the drywall and make it look like the hole was never there.

-M

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How should I repair drywall where heating registers used to be?

We recently had an asbestos abatement crew remove heating ducts in our house that had asbestos-lined duct insulation. Part of the process required them to remove the duct registers in the wall as well.

The result is that I have sections like this in almost every room in the house:

alt text

Yikes. What's the procedure for repairing drywall like this?

I was thinking of doing something similar to Niall's recommendation here. Basically cut back some extra drywall on the sides so there's room on all of the studs (which would also have the benefit of removing the damaged sides... then put in a cross support between the studs and screw the drywall to all sides and the cross support. Then mud/tape as usual.

Is there a better way to do this? Keep in mind that I'm a beginner and need to do this procedure multiple times.

I should also mention that we're not planning to add the registers back at this time... it'll be several years before we get a new furnace anyway. We just want to repair the drywall and make it look like the hole was never there.

-M