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ThreePhaseEel
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You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench: if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24”, depending on your run if. If you are using UF you need 24” of cover, if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services.

Be cautious, as I have had markings be over a Footfoot off and the lines be shallower than code requirements, hand dig when getting close.

I usually go under but in several cases this was impractical (bedrock)due to bedrock. When this happened, I switched from pvc to rigid metal conduit and had the metal pipe above the 18” deep utilities (water, gas and communications in the same trench). I have done this several timestimes; in one case I had a new inspector that thought it had to be a code violation, but she signed off on it after over an hour of trying to find a violation (it is ok to change conduit types, if underground it’s not likely to be exposed to power so no grounding is necessary and by definition a 10’ stick of pipe can still be used as a grounding electrode). And in your back yard it can be as shallow as 6”, so it really did meet all requirements.

You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24” depending on your run if UF you need 24” of cover if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services.

Be cautious I have had markings be over a Foot off and the lines be shallower than code requirements, hand dig when getting close.

I usually go under but in several cases this was impractical (bedrock) I switched from pvc to rigid metal conduit and had the metal pipe above the 18” deep utilities (water, gas and communications in the same trench) I have done this several times in one case I had a new inspector that thought it had to be a code violation, she signed after over an hour of trying to find a violation (it is ok to change conduit types, if underground it’s not likely to be exposed to power so no grounding is necessary and by definition a 10’ stick of pipe can still be used as a grounding electrode. And in your back yard it can be as shallow as 6” so it really did meet all requirements.

You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench: if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24”, depending on your run. If you are using UF you need 24” of cover, if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services.

Be cautious, as I have had markings be over a foot off and the lines be shallower than code requirements, hand dig when getting close.

I usually go under but in several cases this was impractical due to bedrock. When this happened, I switched from pvc to rigid metal conduit and had the metal pipe above the 18” deep utilities (water, gas and communications in the same trench). I have done this several times; in one case I had a new inspector that thought it had to be a code violation, but she signed off on it after over an hour of trying to find a violation (it is ok to change conduit types, if underground it’s not likely to be exposed to power so no grounding is necessary and by definition a 10’ stick of pipe can still be used as a grounding electrode). And in your back yard it can be as shallow as 6”, so it really did meet all requirements.

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Ed Beal
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You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24” depending on your run if UF you need 24” of cover if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services.

Be cautious I have had markings be over a Foot off and the lines be shallower than code requirements, hand dig when getting close.

I usually go under but in several cases this was impractical (bedrock) I switched from pvc to rigid metal conduit and had the metal pipe above the 18” deep utilities (water, gas and communications in the same trench) I have done this several times in one case I had a new inspector that thought it had to be a code violation, she signed after over an hour of trying to find a violation (it is ok to change conduit types, if underground it’s not likely to be exposed to power so no grounding is necessary and by definition a 10’ stick of pipe can still be used as a grounding electrode. And in your back yard it can be as shallow as 6” so it really did meet all requirements.