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My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

UPDATE 1

  1. So my contractor said that the red double pole 20A now is 40A / 240V total. The wire is 10/2. But does it mean "before" there were multiple circuits but now there is only ONE big circuit. Should I be concerned about overload?

  2. There is a subpanel in the house. The photos above are the outside panel located in back of the house.

  3. The wire is 10/2 but it is non-stranded. I don't know if 10 AWG Stranded is a MUST/REQUIRED here or 10/2 is enough.

My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

UPDATE 1

  1. So my contractor said that the red double pole 20A now is 40A / 240V total. The wire is 10/2. But does it mean "before" there were multiple circuits but now there is only ONE big circuit. Should I be concerned about overload?

  2. There is a subpanel in the house. The photos above are the outside panel located in back of the house.

My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

UPDATE 1

  1. So my contractor said that the red double pole 20A now is 40A / 240V total. But does it mean "before" there were multiple circuits but now there is only ONE big circuit. Should I be concerned about overload?

  2. There is a subpanel in the house. The photos above are the outside panel located in back of the house.

  3. The wire is 10/2 but it is non-stranded. I don't know if 10 AWG Stranded is a MUST/REQUIRED here or 10/2 is enough.

Tweeted twitter.com/StackDIY/status/1199025064060084227
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Source Link
HP.
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My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

UPDATE 1

  1. So my contractor said that the red double pole 20A now is 40A / 240V total. The wire is 10/2. But does it mean "before" there were multiple circuits but now there is only ONE big circuit. Should I be concerned about overload?

  2. There is a subpanel in the house. The photos above are the outside panel located in back of the house.

My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

UPDATE 1

  1. So my contractor said that the red double pole 20A now is 40A / 240V total. The wire is 10/2. But does it mean "before" there were multiple circuits but now there is only ONE big circuit. Should I be concerned about overload?

  2. There is a subpanel in the house. The photos above are the outside panel located in back of the house.

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Source Link
HP.
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My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

My contractor installed water tank and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

My contractor installed water tank

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rheem-Performance-50-Gal-Tall-6-Year-4500-4500-Watt-Elements-Electric-Tank-Water-Heater-XE50T06ST45U1/205810674

and it ran for a short while (not sure how many days or weeks) before it’s dead. No hot water, no power in the tank, element burnt.

We replaced another new one but in the process we found out the circuit breaker was one leg burn

BEFORE:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

My electrician said whoever installed it actually crossing the legs so they can get 240V.

The new one (red) looks like this after he replaced

AFTER:

enter image description here

My question is: How is it even “possible” to install the breaker like that to get 240V? Does it mean “someone” has to bend the breaker fitting and force it in? I asked because the evident were gone and I wasn’t home. What’s exactly behind the panel that allowing such installation to create 240V for a small 2-pole? Is it “legal”?

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