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There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

Yes, I would definitely be worried about shottynon-specific product information. If it just says it's galvanized, then assume it's the least amount possible. They'll brag about anything better than the minimum basic electroplating. Look up Simpson's Corrosion Resistance Recommendations and Classifications to determine your environmentenvironmental situation and its requirements.

There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

Yes, I would definitely be worried about shotty product information. If it says it's galvanized, then assume it's the least amount possible. Look up Simpson's Corrosion Resistance Recommendations and Classifications to determine your environment requirements.

There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

Yes, I would definitely be worried about non-specific product information. If it just says it's galvanized, then assume it's the least amount possible. They'll brag about anything better than the minimum basic electroplating. Look up Simpson's Corrosion Resistance Recommendations and Classifications to determine your environmental situation and its requirements.

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There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

Yes, I would definitely be worried about shotty product information. If it says it's galvanized, then assume it's the least amount possible. Look up Simpson's Corrosion Resistance Recommendations and Classifications to determine your environment requirements.

There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.

Yes, I would definitely be worried about shotty product information. If it says it's galvanized, then assume it's the least amount possible. Look up Simpson's Corrosion Resistance Recommendations and Classifications to determine your environment requirements.

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There are different levels of zinc galvanization. If you want it to last longer, then get a thicker layer of zinc on the outside of the steel.

One way to get a thicker layer is to hot dip galvanize it. Another way is use a Simpson hanger that is Z-max plated which is basically just twice electrogalvanized steel plate and actually not hot dipped.

If it's galvanized just a little bit, it'll technically be okay for treated lumber. If you want it to last longer, then get more galvanization on there. Zinc is a sacrificial coating, so as it corrodes it protects the steel less and the steel will begin to rust.