130 reputation
7
bio website
location California
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Feb 14 at 19:42

I've been a computer hobbyist since before the IBM PC, and a professional programmer not too long after that. I've had experience with electronic repair, manufacturing, and testing of professional audio.

I tutored other students in Fortran before PCs existed, built my first computer from bare circuit boards and reject parts (S-100 CP/M system), and transitioned from stereo repair, to professional audio manufacturing at Dolby Labs, where I set up the automated functional testing for Dolby professional equipment. From there, I went into programming full-time as a C programmer for Mac presentation graphics systems, then to Windows C++ video programming. My last 10 years was as a C++ Windows software engineer for a corporate source code control system.

I'm now a Linux user, retired from active work but still helping friends with computer problems, configuration, audio/video setup, and other electronic devices.


Feb
14
comment Gas oven went out, now also gas burners go out after a few minutes. What do I do?
Is it possible a shutoff valve is mostly off somewhere, allowing only a small amount of gas to get through? This, or some other partial blockage, might allow it to pressurize over time, but not allow it to say pressurized under load.
Jan
20
accepted Is it OK to leave a dimmer switch on low constantly (LED light)
Jan
20
comment Is it OK to leave a dimmer switch on low constantly (LED light)
Read the Lutron link on dimmer theory. It was interesting, although I don't understand why they used the same illustration for the sine wave's phase control for the first three types. Seems like they should be different. Still, I think it answered my questions, so I'll mark your answer as correct. Wasn't much competition, anyway. :-)
Jan
20
awarded  Student
Jan
20
comment Why isn't my garage door opener opening the door?
Definitely check it by hand (disconnected from chain). Are the springs OK? If one or more springs is broken, it will be very hard to open.
Jan
20
awarded  Commentator
Jan
20
comment Is it OK to leave a dimmer switch on low constantly (LED light)
Thanks for all the links; but the dimmer I got was one of the ones specifically listed on the light as being compatible (both made by Leviton), so no problem there. I just wanted to make sure it was OK in case it got left on at a low level. I guess I should assume it's safe, or they wouldn't allow it to be sold.
Jan
20
comment Is it OK to leave a dimmer switch on low constantly (LED light)
I think you might have the right idea. I have a nightlight already, and it's probably best to keep it. I was first worried that the new light would accidentally be left on dim, since our old light only had a dimmer to turn it on and off. I think I'll not worry about it, but try to keep it off.
Jan
20
asked Is it OK to leave a dimmer switch on low constantly (LED light)
Jan
18
comment Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
Thanks for your help, especially the diagram. I now understand more about AC wiring and testing. I connected my AC trouble light to the wires, and it lit (dimly), but the overhead light came on too, so I confirmed it was as you said. Hooked up the dimmer, and it worked well. In retrospect, I can see that there was really no other feasible way it could have been wired.
Jan
18
awarded  Scholar
Jan
18
accepted Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
Jan
18
revised Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
deleted 258 characters in body
Jan
18
comment Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
I had hoped that might be the case, and it makes sense, I believe, but my circuit tester does show 120 volts across the two wires; the one I have lights up for 120 or 240 volts, and it lit up at 120 volts. Is that expected? This is without the dimmer in the circuit, if that matters.
Jan
18
awarded  Editor
Jan
18
comment Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
I edited my question to add more info. But the short would be at the switch box. There is a hot and a neutral, with 120 volts across it (I checked with a circuit tester, and also, there is a light in the switch). So if I connect these 2 wires to a switch, it can only short the hot and neutral, right?
Jan
18
revised Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
added 698 characters in body
Jan
18
comment Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
Thanks, but the directions are exactly like every other dimmer and switch I can find, and will not work. It specifies that the black wire needs to be switched, and the white wire needs to be directly connected. There is no way for me to interrupt the black wire, unless I run one from (presumably) the switch box to the light. I can't even replace it with a normal switch, because it would be a direct short across the hot and neutral when turned on.
Jan
18
asked Replace “powered” dimmer switch for old (1950s) house
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer