173 reputation
7
bio website blog.outsharked.com
location Washington, DC
age 45
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Mar 17 at 19:26

I'm James Treworgy, a Washington, DC software developer. I mostly work in ASP.NET, C#, Javascript/jQuery, and MS SQL Server these days. In the last 20 years, I've spent a lot of time designing and developing applications in these technologies as well as PHP, MySQL, and Visual Basic, and a lot of other things that are now forgotten but not always gone.

Find me on Twitter, Linked In, Google+

My favorite pet projects:

CsQuery - A CSS selector engine & jQuery port for C# and .NET. (Yeah, it actually works.)

ImageMapster - jQuery plugin to enhance image maps


Dec
11
comment How do I temporarily cover a hole in my roof?
+1 nail it in. Roof patch goop is amazing stuff, repairing those holes when this is over will take little time and he's very unlikely to ever have problems with the repair for the life of the roof.
Dec
11
comment Is it dangerous to run electrical cords through heating vents?
"This roommate is a contractor and is educated through college for home renovations." That certainly helps explain why it's so hard to find competent contractors.
Dec
7
revised What could I have done wrong while changing to LED bulbs in my recessed lighting?
deleted 161 characters in body
Dec
7
answered What could I have done wrong while changing to LED bulbs in my recessed lighting?
Dec
4
comment Are these walls prepared properly for tile?
Pic, but from what you've described I wouldn't worry about it. If a tile surface is slightly uneven you can certainly skim it with brick mortar or something... but most people would skip a step and just put the thinset on a bit thick. Even on a floor this isn't likely to be a problem (e.g. for around 1/8" or so), and at the top of a wall I can't imagine anything ever happening. Thinset is basically mortar, you don't gain much by putting down mortar and then more mortar over it.
Nov
30
comment Can I connect a drain for my new washing machine to an existing toilet drain?
Can you post a picture? It sounds like what you are describing as the "4 in drain from a toilet" is your stack. If so this is fine.
Nov
28
comment Is it against code to secure junction box using Liquid Nails?
If you are "extending" a wire, shouldn't there already be a junction box where it ends now? Also be aware that code requires the junction box be accessible, so if you're relocating a fixture or something you can't just wall over the junction.
Nov
28
comment How can I mend my metal tables broken arm?
A broken part that requires good lateral strength (versus tensile strength) is going to be difficult or impossible to repair with any kind of glue or epoxy. That is, the shearing force exerted on the arm will just cause it to fail at the weakest point again -- that is the point where it broke and you repaired it. The force acts on it like a lever and puts tremendous stress at that point. If this is made of steel you could have it spot welded or you could fix it with a sleeve of some kind, but anything will be ugly...
Nov
26
answered Can a cheap angle grinder be used to cut concrete and ceramic tiles?
Nov
21
comment How to fit things to a Bungaroosh wall
I don't know much about Bungaroosh beyond what I just read in wikipedia but it sounds about as hard to deal with as the deteriorated plaster in my house. Is the entire wall made of this material? How thick? Or is there something on the outside of the house like wood or brick? I sometimes just end up just going all the way through the plaster to the brick that's an inch or two behind it and using anchors & very long screws.
Nov
21
answered How do I fill holes around a newly fitted ceiling light socket?
Nov
21
awarded  Commentator
Nov
21
comment What tools do I need to make a straight cut in laminated chipboard?
Nice action shots!
Nov
21
comment Should I nail, and glue my hardwood flooring?
By the way I do want to add that context is everything: I was mostly responding to the notion that "nailing is almost always useless" since this is how the vast majority of floors have been installed since the dawn of time. There are lots of different materials, locations (indoor or outdoor, dry or damp, aboveground or on a slab, directly on joists or on a subfloor), and so on and lots of techniques. Nailing is certainly not always right - but it remains the a very common method for installing T&G and dismissing it entirely is like dismissing shingles as a roofing material.
Nov
21
comment Should I nail, and glue my hardwood flooring?
Did you miss the "100 year old" part? While there's nothing that old that's been installed with construction adhesive to compare, I think it's safe to say that's a pretty good life expectancy, and you'd be hard pressed to find a floor that didn't need any maintenance in that time. Call me old fashioned but I'll take nails or staples over glue-down for the long haul any day.
Nov
20
comment Should I nail, and glue my hardwood flooring?
"Nailing hardwood floors is almost always useless" - why? The 100 year old hardwood floor in my house still works fine, except for a few creaks here and there. For a century, I'd say that's acceptable. This is the conventional way to install tongue and groove; these days people probably use pneumatic angle staplers a lot more often than nails, though, but basically the same idea.
Nov
20
awarded  Supporter
Nov
20
revised Can I safely ground a light fixture if the ceiling box has two hot and one neutral wire (no ground wire)
deleted 23 characters in body
Nov
20
awarded  Teacher
Nov
20
revised Can I safely ground a light fixture if the ceiling box has two hot and one neutral wire (no ground wire)
added 241 characters in body