945 reputation
621
bio website jeremywsherman.com
location Atlanta, GA
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Feb 26 at 5:13

Feb
10
comment Can re-closing a circuit-breaker be dangerous?
This is the only answer I've seen that addresses the only immediate danger that occurs as a direct result of closing the breaker. I think the risk of a dangerous arc is far lower in residential settings, but I still follow a safety procedure I picked up from some electrical reading when flipping breakers back on: stand to the side of the panel (clear of any arc shooting out of the panel), look away from the panel (the brightness of an electrical arc can blind you, and an arc could cause the box to explode), and then flip the breaker back on.
Jan
21
comment Why are “Wire Nuts” not used in the UK?
@geerlingguy You actually need two pairs if you want to pretwist heavier wires, one to clamp them at the base of the splice and the other to spin the ends around. I've found when splicing 3 or 4 (or more) wires, it's easiest to pretwist or use push-in connectors, because getting the wire nut to actually grab and twist all the wires into a solid splice without pretwisting them is very frustrating.
Nov
27
comment How to install 230V Light with Light-activated-resistor?
@Kaz Good comment, but please leave it on the post rather than my answer. I'm not sure the asker will get pinged with it down here, and it makes more sense up there, anyway.
Nov
14
comment Should a kitchen sink S-trap be replaced?
So bottom line, if it's a problem - and it can be a problem - you can workaround it by running some slow water to ensure the trap is filled, and you can fix it by replacing it with a properly vented P-trap or a mechanical vent. But if it's not a problem, don't worry about it.
Nov
13
comment Should second trap under kitchen sink S-trap be there?
@bcworkz I'll leave the S-trap alone for now, unless it turns out to be a problem. I think there's a cast iron vent less than 6 feet to the right. A pipe goes up into the wall and then to I-know-not-where. I'll have to get way back and look up at the roof to see if there's a vent pipe coming out up there. A kitchen remodel is coming in the next 6 months or so, so I'll poke at it more then.
Nov
13
comment Should second trap under kitchen sink S-trap be there?
I'm going to patch the hole in the cast iron trap short-term just so we can (hopefully) wash dishes, then replace the cast iron trap entirely this weekend. Thank you for the advice.
Nov
13
comment Should second trap under kitchen sink S-trap be there?
@maple_shaft That stuff looks gooey but doesn't feel it. I think maybe this is not the first time this trap has sprung a leak, and that mess is the result of prior patching. Anyway, the cast iron trap will be going away. :)
Nov
13
comment Should second trap under kitchen sink S-trap be there?
@Tester101 I think the PVC trap postdates the cast iron one. The cast iron trap appears to have aged the same as the rest of the drain piping, so I think it's original (1940s). I figure there probably wasn't a trap directly under the sink at one time, so the cast iron trap was the only trap.
Nov
13
comment Should second trap under kitchen sink S-trap be there?
@ChrisF "How do I fix my sink?" is too localized. I split it up into a few questions that I believe can be addressed individually, and that I hope are general enough to be useful to others searching later. I didn't even ask my original question (temporarily patching cast iron) because we already had a good question and answer addressing that.
Nov
2
comment Why is there so much metal-clad wiring in my house?
Any way to distinguish between armored cable, metal-clad cable, and flexible metallic conduit after it's been installed?
Oct
29
comment How can I safely remove an outlet from service?
Add to that my personal anecdotal data that plastic plugs are either terribly obnoxious to take out when you as an adult want to use the receptacle, or far too easy for anyone and anything to remove. Tamper-resistant receptacles are the correct solution to the problem for 15/20A receptacles. Higher ampacity receptacles expect to be hidden behind heavy appliances, which effectively prevents tampering. If they're not, disabling them seems a good move.
Oct
24
comment What's the right connector for connecting #12 solid copper to #14 stranded?
Twist the strands clockwise when looking at the end of the wire. It makes the strands act more like a single wire and helps in splicing them to other wires.
Oct
23
comment What kind of electrical outlet is this, and how do I replace it?
Also, those cables look quite fat - backwiring is only approved for 14 AWG nowadays, though some older devices might still say 12 or 14 AWG. So I would definitely go for the loop and setscrew connection approach.
Oct
23
comment What kind of electrical outlet is this, and how do I replace it?
@MPelletier US multi-wire circuits like that require either a double breaker or that the two breakers be yoked together so that you can't only turn off one. You might consider fixing the breaker box wiring for safety purposes. The next person might not be so observant.
Oct
23
comment What are some inexpensive options for replacing a single-stall garage door?
Magic search term here is likely to be "carriage doors". I have similar plans for a 1-car garage door. Some good links: a discussion with diagrams and a how-to page with process photos.
Oct
23
comment What is an affordable 2D drafting software for amateurs?
I believe LibreCad is a fork of QCad, and it's what I settled on. It's got an unbelievably awkward interface, but it mostly works.
Oct
21
comment Should I be worried about this gap in electrical conduit?
That said, I can't resist sharing this rubber splice tape training video from 3M. It brought to life a lot of paper descriptions I'd read of using rubber splice tape and friction tape and answered some lingering questions.
Oct
21
comment Should I be worried about this gap in electrical conduit?
Rubber splice tape will insulate and waterproof splices, but it won't protect the wires from damage or restore ground continuity, both of which are concerns here.
Oct
14
comment Which material should I use for a whiteboard that would erase easily?
My office has some whiteboard paint. Erasing is difficult, even freshly written text tends to leave some traces unless you go at it with a spray or wet wipe. People end up just writing on any nearby glass instead; even dry erase markers wipe off of glass just fine. Got a big window? Give it a go.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@Tester101 Good point about grounding. So, whenever a screw penetrates a box, there's the abrasion issue to worry about in all boxes, and the grounding issue to worry about in non-metallic boxes.