950 reputation
723
bio website jeremywsherman.com
location Atlanta, GA
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 3 at 14:10

Oct
14
comment Which material should I use for a whiteboard that would erase easily?
My office has some whiteboard paint. Erasing is difficult, even freshly written text tends to leave some traces unless you go at it with a spray or wet wipe. People end up just writing on any nearby glass instead; even dry erase markers wipe off of glass just fine. Got a big window? Give it a go.
Oct
7
revised How to wire in my replacement fluorescent light fixture?
Title as question, break text into paragraphs.
Oct
7
suggested suggested edit on How to wire in my replacement fluorescent light fixture?
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@Tester101 Good point about grounding. So, whenever a screw penetrates a box, there's the abrasion issue to worry about in all boxes, and the grounding issue to worry about in non-metallic boxes.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
Madison Electric makes nearly identical boxes under their "SmartBox" line. They're a special order from Home Depot. They're a pain for old work, though - if you're at all off from where the stud is, you end up having to patch drywall, where with wing-style old work boxes, you just move a good distance away, cut the perfect to-fit hole, and screw them down, no patching necessary.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
Those screw-wing old work boxes (the second photo above) work great with thick drywall. The screws that hold the wings are nice and long, so they accommodate deep walls.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@oscilatingcretin As MatthewPK points out in response to Skaperen's answer, you might instead be violating the box's listing, and since it would then be unlisted, you'd be using an unlisted box, which would be violating Code. Roundabout, but there you go.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@MatthewPK Is there anywhere you can actually view the UL documents without forking out cash? I know with enough clicks I've gotten to see TOC and scope, but never the full text. Without seeing them, I feel like we're shooting in the dark.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@KarlKatzke 314.23(B)(1) addresses through-nailing/screwing to attach a box, hence the discussion of fasteners "pass[ing] through the box." So if you were nailing/screwing from the outside of the box, through the box, and then through the back or side of the box in order to pin it to a stud or an unfinished wall behind, then this would apply. It's not clear to me that it applies to screws that start within the box and pass through the exterior to attach it. That said, the advice about protecting wires against abrasion from screw threads is always good practice.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@Tester101 The concern with screws is that the threads might abrade the wire insulation. Provided you screw the screws all the way in, you should be compliant. The problem is, sometimes you'll hit a drywall screw or nail while trying to mount the box, and then you either move the box or leave screws exposed. (This problem goes away in new work, but can be a real problem for old work, since "move the box" means "make the hole bigger and have fun patching".)
Oct
7
comment Can two circuits' neutrals be tied together (not a single neutral wire, but two that have been connected)?
Multiwire circuits (two hots sharing a neutral) have to be on a single double breaker, or the two breakers have to be tied such that turning one off turns the other off. This IS a safety issue.
Oct
4
comment How to repair latex paint on drywall in bathroom?
There are switches and vent fans that actually have a moisture sensor in them, as well. Those let you replace guessing how long to run the fan for with running the vent fan for exactly the right amount of time.
Oct
3
comment How do I wire this kitchen fluorescent ceiling fixture?
The fixture should have a wiring diagram. What does it say to do? Also, what's the Home Depot SKU of the fixture you bought? (It's on their website as "Store SKU" and on your receipt.)
Oct
3
comment Why does my ceiling fan light turn off by itself?
Is it overlamped, with a bulb that's a higher wattage than what it's listed to supply? Lots of devices have thermal sensors that kill power to the light if it heats up too much. (A bit of darkness beats a fire.)
Oct
3
comment Why does my ceiling fan light turn off by itself?
Don't just flip the switch off. Kill power to the entire circuit at the breaker box before bending out the contact. That, or very carefully use a listed insulated tool. If someone wired the light wrong (interrupting the white, grounded conductor rather than the black), the socket will still be hot even with the switch off.
Oct
2
comment Which exterior outlet cover is required by NEC?
Seconding the "always use an in-use cover" advice. Someone will eventually leave an extension cord or Christmas lights plugged in. If not you, then the next person to live there.
Oct
2
comment Will a 15A receptacle on a 20A circuit fail if I draw over 15A combined from each outlet?
And you can install a 20A single receptacle on a 15A individual branch circuit. Combine 210.21(B)(1) with (B)(3), which only restricts ratings when you start having >1 recep/outlet on the circuit.
Oct
2
comment Will a 15A receptacle on a 20A circuit fail if I draw over 15A combined from each outlet?
Actually, a simplex 15A receptacle (one yoke with a single plug-in point) that's the only thing on a 20A circuit is not up to Code. It would have to be a 20A receptacle. See 210.21(B)(1).
Oct
2
comment What's the least intrusive way to find out what's in a wall?
@bib Oops, I took for granted you could see the sill. My wallboard/plaster (1" thick total) ends at a flush 1x1 nailed to the studs just above the sill plate, so I can see the sill plate everywhere.
Oct
2
awarded  Necromancer