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Oct
24
comment What's the right connector for connecting #12 solid copper to #14 stranded?
Twist the strands clockwise when looking at the end of the wire. It makes the strands act more like a single wire and helps in splicing them to other wires.
Oct
23
comment What kind of electrical outlet is this, and how do I replace it?
Also, those cables look quite fat - backwiring is only approved for 14 AWG nowadays, though some older devices might still say 12 or 14 AWG. So I would definitely go for the loop and setscrew connection approach.
Oct
23
comment What kind of electrical outlet is this, and how do I replace it?
@MPelletier US multi-wire circuits like that require either a double breaker or that the two breakers be yoked together so that you can't only turn off one. You might consider fixing the breaker box wiring for safety purposes. The next person might not be so observant.
Oct
23
comment What are some inexpensive options for replacing a single-stall garage door?
Magic search term here is likely to be "carriage doors". I have similar plans for a 1-car garage door. Some good links: a discussion with diagrams and a how-to page with process photos.
Oct
23
answered How do I select a color to paint various rooms in my home? What color guides are best?
Oct
23
comment What is an affordable 2D drafting software for amateurs?
I believe LibreCad is a fork of QCad, and it's what I settled on. It's got an unbelievably awkward interface, but it mostly works.
Oct
21
comment Should I be worried about this gap in electrical conduit?
That said, I can't resist sharing this rubber splice tape training video from 3M. It brought to life a lot of paper descriptions I'd read of using rubber splice tape and friction tape and answered some lingering questions.
Oct
21
comment Should I be worried about this gap in electrical conduit?
Rubber splice tape will insulate and waterproof splices, but it won't protect the wires from damage or restore ground continuity, both of which are concerns here.
Oct
14
comment Which material should I use for a whiteboard that would erase easily?
My office has some whiteboard paint. Erasing is difficult, even freshly written text tends to leave some traces unless you go at it with a spray or wet wipe. People end up just writing on any nearby glass instead; even dry erase markers wipe off of glass just fine. Got a big window? Give it a go.
Oct
7
revised How to wire in my replacement fluorescent light fixture?
Title as question, break text into paragraphs.
Oct
7
suggested approved edit on How to wire in my replacement fluorescent light fixture?
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@Tester101 Good point about grounding. So, whenever a screw penetrates a box, there's the abrasion issue to worry about in all boxes, and the grounding issue to worry about in non-metallic boxes.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
Madison Electric makes nearly identical boxes under their "SmartBox" line. They're a special order from Home Depot. They're a pain for old work, though - if you're at all off from where the stud is, you end up having to patch drywall, where with wing-style old work boxes, you just move a good distance away, cut the perfect to-fit hole, and screw them down, no patching necessary.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
Those screw-wing old work boxes (the second photo above) work great with thick drywall. The screws that hold the wings are nice and long, so they accommodate deep walls.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@oscilatingcretin As MatthewPK points out in response to Skaperen's answer, you might instead be violating the box's listing, and since it would then be unlisted, you'd be using an unlisted box, which would be violating Code. Roundabout, but there you go.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@MatthewPK Is there anywhere you can actually view the UL documents without forking out cash? I know with enough clicks I've gotten to see TOC and scope, but never the full text. Without seeing them, I feel like we're shooting in the dark.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@KarlKatzke 314.23(B)(1) addresses through-nailing/screwing to attach a box, hence the discussion of fasteners "pass[ing] through the box." So if you were nailing/screwing from the outside of the box, through the box, and then through the back or side of the box in order to pin it to a stud or an unfinished wall behind, then this would apply. It's not clear to me that it applies to screws that start within the box and pass through the exterior to attach it. That said, the advice about protecting wires against abrasion from screw threads is always good practice.
Oct
7
comment I modified a nail-in electrical box to use screws instead of nails. Is there some code that prevents that?
@Tester101 The concern with screws is that the threads might abrade the wire insulation. Provided you screw the screws all the way in, you should be compliant. The problem is, sometimes you'll hit a drywall screw or nail while trying to mount the box, and then you either move the box or leave screws exposed. (This problem goes away in new work, but can be a real problem for old work, since "move the box" means "make the hole bigger and have fun patching".)
Oct
7
comment Can two circuits' neutrals be tied together (not a single neutral wire, but two that have been connected)?
Multiwire circuits (two hots sharing a neutral) have to be on a single double breaker, or the two breakers have to be tied such that turning one off turns the other off. This IS a safety issue.
Oct
4
comment How to repair latex paint on drywall in bathroom?
There are switches and vent fans that actually have a moisture sensor in them, as well. Those let you replace guessing how long to run the fan for with running the vent fan for exactly the right amount of time.